The Pulitzer Prize Story: News Stories, Editorials, Cartoons, and Pictures from the Pulitzer Prize Collection at Columbia University

By John Hohenberg | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

"What does it take to win a Pulitzer Prize?"

"Where can I find some examples of the work of winners of the Pulitzer Prizes in Journalism?"

These are the questions that have been asked of me most frequently since I became secretary of the Advisory Board on the Pulitzer Prizes five years ago.

As to the first, I can't answer it. I wish I could.

As to the second, Columbia University decided something should be done about it. This book is the result.


BASIS FOR THE TEXT

A total of 251 Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism has been awarded from 1917 through 1958—41 gold medals for public service for newspapers and 210 cash prizes for individuals in varying amounts up to $1,000. (Most individual prizes have been $1,000, but for a time they were reduced to $500; moreover, some prizes have been shared.)

Ninety-eight newspapers and 187 individuals, seven entire newspaper staffs, three wire services, three syndicates, and one group award for war correspondents have figured in the prizes. Twenty‐ nine news organizations or their staff members have been multiple winners. There have also been 13 special citations for journalism.

With so large a selection to choose from, it became obvious from the first that not everyone could be represented; nor was it possible even to choose the best. Trying to pick the best of the Pulitzer

-vii-

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