Asia's Computer Challenge: Threat or Opportunity for the United States & the World?

By Jason Dedrick; Kenneth L. Kraemer | Go to book overview

to Korea; the governments of India and Vietnam have tried to tap their overseas "human resources on deposit" in the United States as well. But no one has done this as effectively as Taiwan, nor has anyone else created such a favorable environment for entrepreneurial activity as has Taiwan. The ability to take advantage of its cultural idiosyncrasies is a critical factor in the success of Taiwan's business and government strategies for computers, and the network of personal connections can be seen as the "invisible hand" behind Taiwan's computer industry.


Conclusions

Taiwan's success in computer production can be explained primarily as a result of private sector initiative supported by government efforts to develop capabilities and resources lacking in Taiwan's SME-dominated industry structure. Taiwan also was fortunate that the PC revolution created an international industry structure that lowered entry barriers to the computer industry and presented opportunities for small players to participate in the industry's global production system. Conversely, U.S. companies were fortunate to find such a source of low-cost suppliers, allowing them to avoid the dependence on Japanese suppliers that had been so costly to the consumer electronics industry. This convergence of interests has been generally beneficial to both the United States and Taiwan, although there have been winners and losers at the company level.

One key to Taiwan's success has been an industry structure consisting of a large number of highly focused companies that together make up a broad and deep industry cluster for the PC industry. Those companies not only move quickly on their own, but the network structure of industrial relations also allows for rapid coordination among companies to respond to new market opportunities. Another key success factor has been the breadth and dynamism of Taiwan's global linkages. Access to information, technology, and overseas markets through the web of personal, company, and multinational connections has given Taiwan a tremendous advantage in the PC industry. Finally, the role of government industrial policy in stimulating and coordinating private sector efforts has been vital to Taiwan's success.

Ultimately, both business and government strategy have depended on the web of personal relationships that make it much easier for companies to work together and with government than is the case in most countries. The fact that these connections extend far beyond the borders of the small island of Taiwan is especially important in helping Taiwan integrate into the global PC production network and avoid the isolation that has plagued the Japanese and Korean PC industries.

Taiwan's ability to compete in computers has been exceptional at both the company and country level, but like the other Asian NIES, the country faces continuing challenges as it tries to sustain its momentum in the industry. The shift of labor-intensive production offshore has helped Taiwanese companies stay competitive in the most cost sensitive market segments, such as

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Asia's Computer Challenge: Threat or Opportunity for the United States & the World?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments v
  • Contents xi
  • List of Figures xv
  • List of Tables xvii
  • 1 - Competing in Computers 3
  • 2 - Globalization of the Computer Industry 28
  • Conclusions 71
  • 3 - Japan and the PC Revolution 76
  • Summary 90
  • Summary 104
  • Conclusions 113
  • 4 - Asia's New Competitors 116
  • Conclusions 143
  • Conclusions 172
  • 5 - Asia's New Competitors 174
  • Conclusions 209
  • 6 - Findings from the East Asian Experience 211
  • 7 - Lessons for Companies and Countries 254
  • Summary 263
  • Conclusions 278
  • 8 - Competing in Computers in the Network Era 280
  • Conclusion - Asia's Computer Challenge 319
  • Appendix 321
  • Notes 325
  • References 343
  • Index 353
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 368

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.