Crossing Swords: Politics and Religion in Mexico

By Roderic Ai Camp | Go to book overview

Church into politically tainted activities. Human rights issues appeal to a broader group of bishops because of their clearer moral implications.

Neither the hierarchy nor the Mexican people see the Church as playing a direct political role, but a redefinition of its responsibilities, socially and economically, would have important political repercussions on the political process at a time of dynamic change. An awareness of this influence on the part of public figures has encouraged increasing criticism of the Church among those who suspect its motives. Mexicans themselves may take greater interest in political outcomes as these same issues confront Church authorities and laity alike.


NOTES
1.
A shorter, different version of this chapter appeared in the Latin American Research Review 29, no. 3 ( 1994): 69-100.
2.
David C. Leege, M. R. Welch, and T. A. Trozzolo, "Religiosity, Church Social Teaching, and Socio-Political Attitudes," Review of Religious Research 28 ( 1986): 118. The authors note, however, that the relationship is stronger when concerned with family life and sexuality than with economic and political matters.
3.
In a comprehensive survey of some 14,000 regular attenders at Mass, nearly three- quarters said laity and priests worked together, and an equal number described their priest as a friend or as someone very close. Comisión Episcopal para el Apostolado de los Laicos, Que piensan los laicos mexicanos del sinodo '87 ( Mexico City: CEM, 1986), 33.
4.
Kenneth D. Wald, D. E. Owen, and S. D. Hill, Jr., "Churches as Political Communities," American Political Science Review 82, no. 2 ( June 1988): 533.
5.
The most comprehensive survey of the literature on the relationship between religion and politics in the United States, which offers the strongest theoretical underpinnings, is Kenneth D. Wald, Religion and Politics in the United States ( New York: St. Martin's, 1987), especially "The Religious Dimension of American Political Behavior,"61-101.
6.
Kenneth D. Wald, D. E. Owen, and S. D. Hill, Jr., "Churches as Political Communities,"543-544.
7.
Edwin Eloy Aguilar et al., "Protestantism in El Salvador: Conventional Wisdom versus the Survey Evidence," Latin American Research Review 28, no. 2 ( 1993): 19.
8.
See, for example, the numerous essays in Edgar Butler and Jorge A. Bustamante, eds., Sucesión Presidencial: The 1988 Mexican Presidential Election ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1991), and Judith Gentleman, Mexican Politics in Transition ( Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1987).
9.
Oscar Aguilar and Ismael Martínez, "La iglesia católica mexicana como factor de riesgo para la estabilidad del sistema político mexicano," unpublished paper, May 1987; Guillermo Correa, "Une a intelectuales e iglesia, la lucha contra la imposición electoral," Proceso, no. 513, September 1, 1986, 28-29; David Torres Mejía, "El regreso de la iglesia," in Polftica y partidos en las eleciones federales de 1985 ( Mexico City: UNAM, 1987), 20-25; Dennis Goulet, "Tbe Mexican Church: Into the Public Arena," America, April 8, 1989, 318-322.
10.
Marjorie Miller, "Mexico Church-State Relations: Stepping Out from the Shadows," Los Angeles Times, April 29, 1990; "Iglesia y estado: los puntos del conflicto," Nexos, no. 141 ( September 1989): 19-23.
11.
Joseph Klesner, "Changing Patterns of Electoral Participation and Official PartySupport in Mexico,"

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crossing Swords: Politics and Religion in Mexico
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - Church and State Foundations of Analysis 3
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - Historical Underpinnings and Reform Two Decades in Brief Repose 24
  • Notes 41
  • Issues Facing the Church Politics, Partisanship, and Development 50
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - Issues Facing the Church Moral and Spiritual Challenges 79
  • Notes 99
  • 5 - Religion, Politics, and the Laity 109
  • Notes 126
  • 6 - Becoming a Priest Why Mexicans Enter the Clergy 135
  • Notes 150
  • Educating the Clergy from Priest to Bishop 154
  • Notes 174
  • 8 - Who Are the Bishops? Consequences of Family and Place 180
  • Notes 199
  • 9 - Church-State Interlocks Informal Relations 202
  • Notes 222
  • 10 - Structure and Decision Making 228
  • Notes 251
  • 11 - Structure and Decision Making the Bishop in His Diocese 259
  • Notes 276
  • 12 - The Church Viewed through Political and Clerical Lenses 283
  • Notes 302
  • Appendix - Mexican Bishops 309
  • Bibliographic Essay 319
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 344

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.