Keeping Time: Readings in Jazz History

By Robert Walser | Go to book overview
Contents
Prefacevii
Acknowledgmentsxii
First Accounts1
1. Sidney Bechet's Musical Philosophy3
2. "Whence Comes Jass?" Walter Kingsley5
3. The Location of "Jass"New Orleans Times-Picayune7
4. A "Serious" Musician TakesJazz Seriously Ernest Ansermet9
5. "A Negro Explains 'Jazz' " James Reese Europe12
6. "Jazzing Away Prejudice"Chicago Defender15
7. The "Inventor of Jazz" Jelly Roll Morton16
The Twenties23
8. Jazzing Around the Globe Burnet Hersbey25
9. "Does Jazz Put the Sin in Syncopation?" Anne Shaw Faulkner32
10. Jazz and African Music Nicholas G. J. Ballanta-Taylor36
11. The Man Who Made a Lady out of Jazz (Paul Whiteman) Hugh C. Ernst39
12. "The Jazz Problem"The Etude41
13. "The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain" Langston Hughes55
14. A Black Journalist Criticizes Jazz Dave Peyton57
15. "The Caucasian Storms Harlem" Rudolf Fisher60
16. The Appeal of Jazz Explained R. W. S. Mendl65
The Thirties71
17. What Is Swing? Louis Armstrong73
18. Looking Back at "The Jazz Age" Alain Locke77
19. Don Redman: Portrait of a Bandleader Roi Ottley80
20. Defining "Hot Jazz" Robert Goffin82
21. An Experience in Jazz History John Hammond86
22. On the Road with Count Basie Billie Holiday96
23. Jazz at Carnegie Hall James Dugan and John Hammond101
24. Duke Ellington Explains Swing106
25. Jazz and Gender During the War Years Down Beat111
The Forties121
26. "Red Music" Josef Škvorecký123
27. "From Somewhere in France" Charles Delauney129
28. Johnny Otis Remembers Lester Young135
29. "A People's Music" Sidney Finkelstein135

-v-

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Keeping Time: Readings in Jazz History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xii
  • First Accounts 1
  • The Twenties 23
  • The Thirties 71
  • The Forties 121
  • The Fifties 193
  • The Sixties 251
  • The Seventies 295
  • The Eighties 325
  • References 364
  • The Nineties 387
  • References 424
  • Editing Notes 425
  • Select Bibliography 427
  • Index 439
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