Amazon Conservation in the Age of Development: The Limits of Providence

By Ronald A. Foresta | Go to book overview

PREFACE

Writing this book was a perverse and unpleasant task from beginning to end. During the years it took up, I felt trapped by my own shortcomings as a scholar and betrayed by some of the more perfidious and shabby inhabitants of the districts I passed through. As human nature would have it, now that the task is finally behind me, the extent of my debts to others is beginning to dawn on me. It was the good friends, gracious informants, and fine associates who made it possible for me to see it through. I will never be able to repay them for their help but I can at least gratefully acknowledge it.

Roger Sedjo was a source of advice and hard-nosed yet positive criticism from the earliest stages of the project. His responses to my evolving ideas were important measures of my progress.

Kent Redford had an uncanny knack giving exactly the right counsel. It seemed to come so naturally to him that I'm not sure he was even aware of it.

Gary Wetterberg showed a constant interest in the project and gave it much of his valuable time. He generously shared his documents with me and patiently clarified points when needed, which was often.

Paulo Nogueira-Neto gave me access to his agency's staff, records, and field stations, and even more important, to his own insights on Brazilian conservation, which were always perceptive and frequently profound.

Maria Tereza Jorge Pádua took the project under her wing and made me the beneficiary of her knowledge and observations from the earliest formative stages to the final writing.

Kenton Miller was similarly willing to share his experiences and insights with me.

Those Brazilian conservation administrators whom I interviewed were unfailingly generous with their time and insights. I am in debt to all of them, especially Heloiso Figueiredo and Raquel Milano.

The many American conservationists whom I interviewed and

-ix-

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