Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation

By Robert I. Rotberg | Go to book overview

resolving the war. The availability of expatriate funding, illegal light weapons, and local recruits means that Prabhakaran can continue the war for as long as the Sri Lankan army forces fail to secure key positions in the north that are linked to the south by military supply routes. So far, the LTTE has done a good enough job in keeping the armed forces at bay and, over time, frustrating any significant gains. Although the government is facing a major resource crunch, it seems likely that it will continue to enjoy a financial base robust enough to prevent the Tamil Tigers from making the territorial gains they require for viability as a separatist entity.

An end to the war does not necessarily mean an end to the conflict. Although the LTTE may now be deeply discredited, due to their tactics and behavior, its original war aims were influenced by exclusion and uneven development. The Sinhalese elite has much ground to give in the event of a peace settlement. If a peace settlement coincides with a skewed program of economic reconstruction similar to the structural adjustment programs of the 1980s, Sri Lanka could all too easily find itself back where it started, in the midst of violent conflict but with different players.


Notes
1.
Guy Arnold, Wars in the Third World since 1945 ( London, 1991), 506.
2.
R. Gunaratne, Indian Intervention in Sri Lanka: The Role of India's Intelligence Forres ( Colombo, 1993), 2-3.
3.
In November 1997, the Jain commission completed its report on the assassination of former prime minister Rajiv Gandhi. Criticism in the report of a number of key supporters of the United Front and the political impact of the report eventually led to the Congress party's withdrawal of support for the United Front government and an election.
4.
Thomas A. Marks, Maoist Insurgency Since Vietnam ( London, 1996), 186.
5.
During this period, the Khalistanis were extremely active in the Punjab and a resurgent Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front was only just over the horizon. Lesser problems were evident in Darjeeling, Assam, Bihar, and Maharashtra, many focused upon state-level language policies.
6.
Guneratne, Indian Intervention in Sri Lanka, xiii.
7.
S. Ali, "Win Some, Lose Some: The Indian Airlift to Jaffna Has Mixed Results," Far Eastern Economic Review, CXXXVI ( 25 June 1987), 23-24.
8.
A. Nauriya, "The Flight of the Eagle: High Cost of India's Sri Lankan Policy," Economic and Political Weekly, XXII ( 20 June 1987), 981.
9.
The level of Indian anxiety over a non- South Asian foreign presence in Sri Lanka is reflected in an op-ed piece by Jasjit Singh, director of the Institute for Defence Studies and Analysis in Delhi: "Mere have been reports in the press about the possibility of an ELF (Extremely Low Frequency) system being part of the Voice Of America (VOA) high-powered transmitting station being established at Chilaw on Sri Lanka's west coast. If true, this has serious implications for strategic balance and superpower conflict in the Indian Ocean besides grave environmental hazards of radiation to the population in and around the VOA transmitters this brings super power confrontation and possible nuclear conflict to India's doorstep." US Transmitters in Lanka: Grim Dangers for the Region: Times of India ( 6 March 1985).

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.