Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation

By Robert I. Rotberg | Go to book overview

society. Educational systems are also implicated in political contests, and the way in which the current system of education is organized does have important consequences for ethnic understanding. An increased emphasis within the system on values education could yield some dividends. Such efforts however, need to be combined with changes in pedagogy. An authoritarian classroom is not the best training for democracy and valuing the rights of others. Sri Lanka thus looks toward the twenty-first century with a clear understanding of what needs to be done, but with great material and political obstacles.


Notes
1.
See Chandra Richard de Silva, Sri Lanka: A History, 2d. ed. ( New Delhi, 1997), 259-77, and the works cited in de Silva, Sri Lanka, 346-49.
2.
See Chandra Richard de Silva, "The Politics of University Admissions: A Review of Some Aspects of the Admissions Policy in Sri Lanka, 1971-1978," Sri Lanka Journal of Social Sciences I ( 1978), 85-123.
3.
See Kingsley M. de Silva, "University Admissions and Ethnic Tension in Sri Lanka, 1977-1982," in Robert A. Goldman and A. Jeyaratnam Wilson (eds.), From Independence to Statehood: Managing Ethnic Conflict in Five Asian and African Countries ( London, 1984), 97-110.
4.
Up to 1.5 percent of admissions for any area (except medicine and engineering) is allowed for those who meet minimum standards and excel in extracurricular activities, for the personnel of security forces, and for those who have studied abroad and obtained foreign qualifications. Sri Lanka Universities Year Book, 1996 ( Colombo, 1997), 6.
5.
National Education Commission (NEC), An Action Oriented Strategy Towards National Education Policy ( Colombo, 1995), 7-8.
6.
See statistics in the Sri Lanka Universities Year Book 1996, 122-24.
7.
The Constitution of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, Section 21(2), ( Colombo, 1978). This is repeated in Section 48 of the October 1997 proposals (however, in 1978, the national languages were defined as Sinhala and Tamil; the October 1997 draft adds English): "(48)(1) Subject to paragraph (2) of this Article, where one national language is a medium of instruction for or in any course, department or faculty of any university directly or indirectly financed by the state, the other national languages shall also be made media of instruction for or in such course, department or faculty for students who prior to their admission to such university, were educated through the medium of such other national language.

(2) Compliance with the preceding paragraph of this article shall not be obligatory if such other relevant national languages are the media of instruction for or in any like course, department or faculty either at any other campus or branch of such university or of any other like university."

8.
Gerald H. Peiris, Development and Change in Sri Lanka: Geographical Perspectives (Kandy, 1996), 306.
9.
Sri Lanka, Ministry of Education and Higher Education, Educational Statistics of Sri Lanka, 1992 ( Colombo, 1993), 48. In that year, Nuwara Eliya, with only 6.7 percent of the student population, still had 11.7 percent of the one- and two-teacher government schools in the country. This was after the number of such schools had been dramatically reduced from 173 to 79 between 1985 and 1991.
10.
See Angela Little, "Education and Change in Plantations: The Case of Sri Lanka," Institute of Development Studies Bulletin ( April 1987), 31-37; for an example of an ongoing program, see the

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.