The Art of Midlife: Courage and Creative Living for Women

By Linda N. Edelstein | Go to book overview

4
"FIRST IT WAS IN BLACK AND WHITE, AND THEN IT WAS IN COLOR" Creativity and Insight

Every blade of grass has its angel that bends over it and whispers, "grow, grow." -- Talmud

Imagination is the highest kite one can fly. -- Lauren Bacall

Creative minds have always been known to survive any kind of bad training. -- Anna Freud

It is never too late to be what you might have been. -- George Eliot

It isn't a sin that we are in the dark room. It's just an innocent situation, but how fortunate that someone shows us where the light switch is. -- Pema Chödrön

The speaker at a commencement ceremony I attended recently turned to the graduates, threw open her arms, and exhorted them, "Embrace change!" Being told to embrace change is like being reminded to exercise and eat healthy foods. We know it is good. We just cannot stick to it. Asking for a new view in the middle years opens the door to "embracing change." This chapter describes the attitude of creative thinking that helped women actually act on this desire.

Change requires us to dismantle and rebuild. Creative thinking is an essential instrument for change. It allows us to freely play with new ideas and approach the world with openness and enthusiasm. Creative thinking allows for novel ideas and insights that lead to new ways of being and doing. We do not need to be talented or extremely artistic to think creatively. It is an everyday approach to life, not a one-time production. Many of the women

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