The Art of Midlife: Courage and Creative Living for Women

By Linda N. Edelstein | Go to book overview

broke out of the old mold and found a better way. And in the process, she widened her world, learned more about herself and others, and gained trust and confidence in her ability to manage life.

Women's courage requires a new definition. Psychologist Judith Jordan suggests that courage, "unlike macho defiance of fear, is the capacity to act meaningfully and with integrity in the face of acknowledged vulnerability. There is no real courage where fear and vulnerability are denied."7 Courage then, is the action that comes with our full awareness of risk, tempered by self-reflection and confidence. This form of courage becomes most apparent in contrast to the alternative -- a life of stagnant complacency or helplessness in which challenges are seen and felt but avoided. Proving that they have courage was never the goal for these women. For them, courage is what it takes to get to the goal. We all show courage when we overcome fear, trust ourselves, and believe in the goal we are aiming toward.

And where is the creativity? Courage is necessary for the expression of oneself, and that expression, in whatever form, is creative. Action taken from the center of us is the foundation for a refocussed life. "If you do not express your own original ideas, if you do not listen to your own being, you will have betrayed yourself. Also you will have betrayed our community in failing to make your contribution to the whole."8


NOTES

Quote in chapter title is from Anais Nin, quoted in Julia Cameron, ( 1992), The artist's way. A spiritual path to higher creativity ( New York: Bantam), p. 156.

1
L. Frank Baum, ( 1979), The wizard of Oz ( New York: Ballantine Books), p. 30, originally published in 1900.
2
Judith Jordan, ( 1992), Relational resilience, Work in Progress, No. 57 ( Wellesley, MA: Stone Center Working Paper Series).
3
S. Josephine Baker, ( 1992), Fighting for life, in J. K. Conway (Ed.), Written by herself ( New York: Vintage Books), p. 165.
4
Ibid.
5
Roy Baumeister and Mark R. Leary, ( 1995), The need to belong: Desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation, Psychological Bulletin 117(3):497-529.
6
National Advisory Mental Health Council, ( 1995, October), Basic behavioral science research for mental health: A national investment, emotion and motivation, Rockville, MD, American Psychologist 50(10):844.
7
Judith Jordan, ( 1990), Courage in connection: Conflict, compassion, creativity, Work in Progress, No. 45 ( Wellesley, MA: Stone Center Working Paper Series), p. 2.
8
Rollo May, ( 1975), The courage to create ( New York: Norton), p. 3.

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of Midlife: Courage and Creative Living for Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.