Capital-Labor Relations in the U.S. Textile Industry

By Barry E. Truchil | Go to book overview

In sum, the offensives by textile capital have drained union membership both in absolute terms and relative to the total number of textile workers employed. This trend has reduced the textile workers' propensity to strike, forcing the union to seek less ambitious goals with regard to both wages and benefits as well as attitudes toward mechanization. Countering these tendencies is evidence of a renewed and more innovative attempt to organize the southern textile labor force. With the possibility of success, former trends may change.


NOTES
1.
John R. Earle, Dean D. Knudson, and Donald W. Shriver Jr., Spindles and Spires ( Atlanta: John Knox Press, 1976), p. 177; see also Foster Rhea Dulles, Labor in America ( New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Company, 1966), p. 308.
2.
Earle, Knudson, and Shriver, Spindles and Spires, p. 177.
6.
Reprinted in ibid., p. 191.
7.
George Tucker, "The Struggle to Organize J.P. Stevens", Political Affairs 57 ( May 1978), p. 3; see also Len DeCaux, Labor Radical ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1970), pp. 284-287. DeCaux discusses the red-baiting within TWOC (from which the Textile Workers Union emerged). Although Emil Rieve was the major person involved, DeCaux asserts that he was an ardent anticommunist throughout his life. Rieve was a delegate to the World Federation of Trade Unions in the Soviet Union. The trip was approved by President Roosevelt and even aided by the State Department. While in the Soviet Union, Rieve expressed disdain for the socialist country, and refused to sign a favorable CIO report of the conference. Nevertheless, the textile industry had some leftistorganized campaigns, particularly the IWW-led Lawrence, Massachusetts, strike in 1912 and the Community Party-led strikes in Passaic, New Jersey, and Gastonia, North Carolina, in 1929 and 1930. Rieve had also been praised by Senator Hubert Humphrey for his efforts to "curb and control Communists and Communist activity on behalf of the American people" in a Senate hearing. Testimony of Emil Rieve, Labor-Management Relations in the Southern Textile Manufacturing Industry, Hearings before the Subcommittee on Labor-Management Relations of the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, U.S. Senate, 81st Cong., 2d sess., August 21-24, 1950, p. 373.
8.
See Textile Workers Union of America, CIO, Report of the Executive Council to the Seventh Biennial Convention, April 28-May 2, 1952, Cleveland, Ohio, pp. 50-54. See also, Report of the Executive Council to the Eighth Biennial Convention, May 3-7, 1954, Atlantic City, pp. 57-61; and Report of the Executive Council to the Ninth Biennial Convention, May 14-18, 1955, Washington, D.C., pp. 23-25.
9.
Mimi Conway, Rise, Gonna Rise ( New York: Anchor Books, 1979), pp. 143- 144.
10.
New York Times, December 15, 1980, p. A15
11.
U.S News and World Report, February 21, 1972, pp. 27-28.
12.
Manuel Castells, The Economic Crisis and American Society ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1980), pp. 89-93. Castells further adds that the labor market segmentation between monopoly and competitive sectors made possible the transfer to monopoly capital of a substantial portion of the value produced in the competitive sector.
13.
Lance Compa, "Back to Basics for the Labor Movement", Working Papers 8, no. 5 (September/ October 1981), pp. 12-16.

-146-

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Capital-Labor Relations in the U.S. Textile Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • Notes xiv
  • 1 - Profile of The Textile Industry 1
  • Notes 14
  • 2 - Mechanization in The Textile Labor Process 17
  • Notes 38
  • 3 - Textile Capital Relocation 41
  • Notes 85
  • 4 - State Intervention In Textile-Labor Relationships 91
  • Notes 121
  • 5 - Weakening Of Textile Labor 127
  • Notes 146
  • 6 - Conclusion 149
  • Appendix: Acquisitions And Deacquisitions of The 15 Largest U.S. Textile Companies, 1946-83 155
  • Selected Bibliography 169
  • Index 193
  • About the Author 195
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