The Constitution and Civil Rights

By Milton R. Konvitz | Go to book overview

4. Federal Fair Employment Practice Bill
H.R. 2232
Union Calendar No. 49 [Report No. 187]
(79th Congress, Ist Session)

In the House of Representatives, February 16, 1945, MRS. NORTON introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Labor; February 20, 1945, Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union and ordered to be printed

A BILL To prohibit discrimination in employment because of race, creed, color, national origin, or ancestry.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That this Act may be cited as the "Fair Employment Practice Act."


FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF POLICY

SEC. 2. (a) The Congress hereby finds—(I) that the practice of discriminating in the matter of employment, and in matters relating thereto, against properly qualified persons because of their race, creed, color, national origin, or ancestry leads to domestic and industrial strife and unrest and forces large segments of the population permanently into substandard conditions of living, thereby creating a drain upon the resources of the Nation and a constant threat to the maintenance of industrial peace and of the standard of living necessary to the health, efficiency, and well-being of workers; and

(2) that the existence of such practices in industries engaged in commerce or in the production of goods for commerce causes the means and instrumentalities of commerce to be used to spread and perpetuate such conditions throughout the several States and causes diminution of employment and wages in such volume as substantially to impair and disrupt the market for goods in commerce, and burdens, hinders, and obstructs commerce.

(b) Individuals shall have the right to work without discrimination

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