Biodiversity Dynamics: Turnover of Populations, Taxa, and Communities

By Michael L. McKinney; James A. Drake | Go to book overview

18
Scale-Independent Interpretations of
Macroevolutionary Dynamics
Richard B. Aronson and Roy E. Plotnick

Most paleobiologists acknowledge that small-scale interactions between organisms can sum to produce large-scale patterns that directly reflect those individual interactions. Vermeij (1977, 1978, 1987a) popularized this idea by showing that increasing predation caused the morphology of gastropod shells to vary in predicatable, similar ways on multiple scales of time and space. A growing body of evidence supports scale-independent, or fractal, models of biological interaction, diversification, and extinction (Burlando 1993; Aronson 1994; McKinney 1995; Perry 1995; Rosenzweig, chapter 14). In apparent opposition to this evidence is the concern that our perceptions of pattern and process depend on our scale of observation (Miller 1990b; Schopf and Ivany, chapter 10; and many others). The “effects of scale” remain a subject of continuing controversy. Newly proposed physical and mathematical models of punctuated dynamics, as well as current paleontological interest in the structure and history of biological communities, bring these issues of scale into sharp focus.

We contend that the effects of scale, as deduced from the theory of punctuated equilibrium and its ecological companion theory, coordinated stasis, have often been misconstrued. We further argue that the debate over stability versus flux in marine communities is muddied by confusion over the appropriate scales and levels of analysis. These problems have arisen because pattern and process have been considered from the wrong perspective. This is

-430-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Biodiversity Dynamics: Turnover of Populations, Taxa, and Communities
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 528

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.