Trends in Social Work, 1874-1956: A History Based on the Proceedings of the National Conference of Social Work

By Frank J. Bruno | Go to book overview

away in the minds of workers of the period. It is an important part of our social heritage today.

One may say with some confidence, therefore, that this account of the Conference, which winnows out, records, and interprets this evolution in thought and attitudes, is an important segment in the total history of the United States. Much has been written on the development of our political institutions, our economic and industrial progress; our social history lags behind. Until it is more fully set forth, the significant lessons we may learn for our own sake and the peculiar contributions of America to world developments cannot be fully understood or appraised. Toward a more adequate chronicle of one significant aspect of our nation's social experience this reflection of the National Conference of Social Work is an important contribution.

The Conference has been fortunate in the choice of its historian. Mr. Bruno has not only been painstaking in detailed study of the documentary material of the organization, in search for outside data which would illuminate the record, and in pursuit of individuals who could supplement his findings; he has also brought to his task many years of personal experience as practitioner in social work and as teacher and head of one of our leading social work professional schools, his own rich knowledge of contemporary thought and social movements, and a rare ability to interpret Conference events against their changing national and world background. His timely labors have put the Conference greatly in his debt. The Conference, in undertaking this history, and Mr. Bruno in carrying it through, have in turn rendered invaluable service to future students of social work, to students of American history, and, we believe, to the public welfare.

SHELBY M. HARRISON Former General Director Russell Sage Foundation

New York, New York December 30, 1947

-x-

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