Joseph B. Eastman: Servant of the People

By Claude Moore Fuess | Go to book overview

Foreword

THIS VOLUME has been prepared at the request and under the auspices of the Joseph B. Eastman Foundation, created by some of Eastman's friends after his death and now held and administered by the Trustees of Amherst College. I have, however, been left completely unrestricted, and with the understanding that undiluted eulogy is what Eastman himself would have disliked most in his biographer. I have made every effort to paint in words a faithful picture of the man's character and achievements as judged by those who knew him best.

There has certainly been no paucity of material. Ample factual information is available in his extensive correspondence, his numerous speeches, and his voluminous published opinions and reports, as well as in contemporary newspapers and magazines. Fortunately, also, Eastman's memory is still so much alive in Washington and elsewhere that it has been possible to gather impressions from a large number of people.

I cannot list here the names of the hundreds of persons who have been consulted in the preparation of this book. Among those to whom I am particularly indebted are some of his college classmates at Amherst--Ernest M. Whitcomb, W. I. Hamilton, Karl O. Thompson, and Chester A. Porter--and a few of his fraternity brothers, including Hugh H. C. Weed, Frederick S. Bale, and Eugene S. Wilson, Jr. The late Dr. Stanley King, formerly president of Amherst College, was most helpful, as have also been Albert W. Atwood, Ernest G. Draper, and other Amherst graduates, especially Paul D. Weathers, the College Treasurer, and President Charles W. Cole. Through the cooperation of Miss Elizabeth Eastman and Mr. Charles D. Mahaffie, of the Interstate Commerce Commission, the Eastman papers have been placed on deposit at

-v-

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Joseph B. Eastman: Servant of the People
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • I - Yankee Background 3
  • II - Growing Up 8
  • III - An Amherst Education 19
  • IV - Apprenticeship in Public Service 37
  • V - Transition to Power 61
  • VI - From State to Nation 80
  • VII - The Independent Commissioner 96
  • VIII - The Prosperity Era 126
  • IX - Valuation Is Vexation 153
  • X - Problems and Policies 166
  • XI - Federal Coordinator of Transportation 180
  • XII - The Coordinator's Task and Achievements 211
  • XIII - Eastman and the New Deal 245
  • XIV - The Last Big Job 270
  • XV - The End of the Road 297
  • XVI - The Measure of a Man 312
  • Index 345
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