Urban Renewal Politics: Slum Clearance in Newark

By Harold Kaplan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI

The Planners

For those who measure the progress of city governments by the development of their planning function, Newark in 1960 would be just emerging from the Dark Ages. In the 1920s and 1930s efforts to promote planned growth in Newark resulted only in a few study groups and abortive, temporary committees. Not until 1943, after almost "300 years of haphazard growth," did the City create a Central Planning Board (CPB) with some permanence, and not until 1955 did Newark hire a professional city planner. Thus, the professional planners and the laymen on CPB arrived late on the urban renewal scene and found a well-established renewal structure. Indeed, they arrived even later and found an even more imposing structure than the civic leaders had found. The planners' choice has been either to come to terms with the system and carve out some niche there for themselves or to denounce the system and seek a restructuring of renewal politics around a central planning office.


THE RISE AND FALL OF CENTRAL PLANNING

In June, 1943, the Board of City Commissioners, acting under the terms of the New Jersey Municipal Planning Act, created the Central Planning Board to prepare a master plan for Newark's future development. 1 Under the terms of the state act any body designated by a local government as its official planning agency was to consist of six lay citizens and three City officials serving ex officio.

After four years of study Harland Bartholomew and Associates submitted a Master Plan urging a twenty-five-year, $300-million capital expenditure program to reverse the pattern of encroaching blight, soaring tax rates, and departing businesses. Bartholomew

-114-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Urban Renewal Politics: Slum Clearance in Newark
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Tables xii
  • Figures xii
  • Abbreviations of Agencies and Organizations xiii
  • Chapter I - Introduction 1
  • Chapter II - Nha: the Strategy of Slum Clearance 10
  • Chapter III - The Politicos 39
  • Chapter IV - The Civic Leaders: Neighborhood Rehabilitation 61
  • Chapter V - The Civic Leaders: Economic Development 93
  • Chapter VI - The Planners 114
  • Chapter VII - The Grass Roots 135
  • Chapter VIII - The Urban Renewal System in Newark 165
  • Chapter IX - Postscript: 1963 184
  • Notes 193
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.