Preface

The essay that follows must speak
for itself. Yet on the topic of truth one prefatory remark
may not be without use. Truth, in one sense, is truth-about.
If I say "Man is finite; his being is mixed with nonbeing," I
have stated a truth about man. Such a truth can be known. It
is essentially something knowable, and it is only knowable.
Throughout the sphere of knowledge, truth in this sense of
truth-about stands as standard and goal. When one speaks of
truth, this is the sense that first comes to mind. Hence, when
one speaks of truth in connection with art, what first comes
to mind is the idea that the question is being raised of
whether and how art may express such truth-about.

That is not the question raised in this essay. That some works of art attempt to state explicit truths is itself doubtless true -- witness, for instance, Pope Essay on Criticism. That others attempt to imply truths is equally true -- every great work of literature, at least, falls into this class. And it may be argued that all art, in one way or another, offers us insight into truth about man and the conditions of his existence. But none of these considerations enters into the course of thought of the present study.

Truth-about is not the only sense of truth, nor is it the ultimate sense of truth. Truth-about is the first in a sequence of forms of truth on which man must build in order to attain

-vii-

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Truth and Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Art as the Expression of Subjectivity 1
  • 2 - Art as the Joint Revelation of Self and World 23
  • 3 - Aesthetics as Linguistics 37
  • 4 - Language as Articulation of Human Being 53
  • 5 - Truth of Statement 87
  • 6 - Truth of Things 105
  • 7 - Truth of Spirit 130
  • 8 - The Spiritual Truth of Art 171
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
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