[4]
Language as Articulation of Human Being

The concept of art as expressive
language dominated aesthetic thought during the first half
of this century. Expression took the commanding position
that beauty had occupied in earlier aesthetics. But the con
cept of expression itself suffers from a weakness because of
which it must be replaced by a new concept. That new
concept is here named "articulation."

The trouble with the expression concept is not that it describes language and the work of art incorrectly. It is that, correct as it may be in its application to both, it describes them only from the outside and not in terms of their actuality as forms of symbolism. The very name itself impresses this externalistic standpoint on its user. To express something is to ex-press it, hence to press it out, to force into outwardness what is inward by nature. Approaching a linguistic sentence from the outside, the expression theory sees it as a thing, involving (1) an external form, a structure of sounds, (2) a content, which does not consist of sounds but is a meaning or some sort of thinkable, understandable, or otherwise representable content, and (3) a process or relationship by which the meaning-content is ex- pressed by or in or into the outer sounds. Similarly, when applied to art, the model of expression sees a piece of music

-53-

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Truth and Art
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Art as the Expression of Subjectivity 1
  • 2 - Art as the Joint Revelation of Self and World 23
  • 3 - Aesthetics as Linguistics 37
  • 4 - Language as Articulation of Human Being 53
  • 5 - Truth of Statement 87
  • 6 - Truth of Things 105
  • 7 - Truth of Spirit 130
  • 8 - The Spiritual Truth of Art 171
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 217
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