The History of the New York City Legislature

By Frederick Shaw | Go to book overview

Appendix E. SUMMARY OF P. R. CHARTER USED IN NEW YORK CITY
1. Each of the city's boroughs was entitled to at least one councilman. Without this provision Richmond would not register sufficient votes to elect a single councilman.
2. Each borough was a separate election district.
3. For each 75,000 valid votes cast within the borough it was entitled to one councilman; for a remainder of 50,000 or more it was entitled to an additional councilman.
4. No primaries were held--all nominations were by petition.
5. To be entitled to nomination a prospective candidate had to file a petition containing valid signatures of 2,000 voters who registered in the borough within eighteen months prior to the date of such filing. The signatures had to be obtained within 100 days of the election. Signers did not have to be registered members of the candidate's party nor be authorized to vote in the party's primary. Party emblems were forbidden on the petitions, but party designations could be printed or written on them.
6. The "birdless" ballot was used--party emblems were forbidden, but party designations were printed on the ballots as certified to the Board of Elections by the official county organizations. Candidates who were not officially certified were prohibited from using the party designation.
7. Blank spaces were provided at the bottom of the ballot for writing in names. These spaces were "at least equal in number to the quotient obtained by dividing the number of registered voters in the borough by seventy-five thousand," and each space was preceded by the same voting square which preceded the printed names higher up on the ballot.
8. All candidates who received less than 2,000 votes on the first count were declared defeated. Their votes were transferred to the next choice among candidates who were still in the running.
9. Seventy-five thousand votes elected a councilman. Once he obtained this total, all additional votes cast for him were transferred to the candidates shown as second choice on the ballots.
10. Losing candidates were counted out one at a time, and their votes were distributed to the other candidates still in the running.
11. If two candidates received the same number of votes at the end of a particular count, the tie was broken by continuing in the

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of the New York City Legislature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.