Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate

By Neil Baldwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
McGuffeyland

A BRIGHT and chilly fall morning, 1879. Henry Ford and his teenaged pals have gathered early before another day of lessons at the Miller School in rural Springwells Township, northeast of Dearbornville, Michigan. Henry, wiry and slight of build, is crouched down at the muddy slope of a ditch draining behind the schoolhouse, busily assembling a miniature waterwheel to run in the dammed stream. Just as the stream begins to rise—the wheel hooked up to an old coffee mill with a rake handle serving as a connecting rod—the bell rings, summoning the reluctant boys to abandon their work and enter the one-room cabin crammed with ten rows of wooden double-desks and stuffy from the heat of an old wood stove. That night, the waterwheel would jam and the ditch would overflow, flooding the neighboring farmer's potato patch.

For the moment, it was time to continue reading in Lesson LIX

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Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter One - Mcguffeyland *
  • Chapter Two - The Great Questions *
  • Chapter Three - Tin Lizzie *
  • Chapter Four - The Christian Century *
  • Chapter Five - Working Man's Friend *
  • Chapter Six - I Know Who Caused the War *
  • Chapter Seven - The Bolshevik Menace *
  • Chapter Eight - Exit Mr. Pipp *
  • Chapter Nine - The Jewish Question *
  • Chapter Ten - Retaliation *
  • Chapter Eleven - The Talmud-Jew *
  • Chapter Twelve - Heinrich Ford *
  • Chapter Thirteen - Sapiro v. Ford *
  • Chapter Fourteen - Apology *
  • Chapter Fifteen - Apostle of Amity *
  • Chapter Sixteen - The Chosen People *
  • Chapter Seventeen - I Am Not a Jew Hater *
  • Chapter Eighteen - Hitler's Medal *
  • Chapter Nineteen - The Radio Priest *
  • Chapter Twenty - Transitions *
  • Afterword *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Bibliography *
  • Notes *
  • Permissions *
  • Index *
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