Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate

By Neil Baldwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
"I Know Who
Caused the War"

ON APRIL 10, 1915, eight months after the guns of August began to thunder, Henry Ford gave an interview for the New York Times Magazine, his first public pronouncement on the "problem" of war. This initial interview, followed by a linked series of bombastic outbursts extending through the anxious summer, is the closest we have come to identifying the beginning of Ford's volatile tendency to blur and often ignore the boundaries between warmongering and international banking (soon enough, both terms were conflated seamlessly with "the Jew"). "Moneylenders and munitions makers cause wars; if Europe had spent money on peace machinery—such as tractors—instead of armaments there would have been no war... The warmongerers urging military preparedness in America are Wall Street bankers... I am opposed to war in every sense of the word." 1

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Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter One - Mcguffeyland *
  • Chapter Two - The Great Questions *
  • Chapter Three - Tin Lizzie *
  • Chapter Four - The Christian Century *
  • Chapter Five - Working Man's Friend *
  • Chapter Six - I Know Who Caused the War *
  • Chapter Seven - The Bolshevik Menace *
  • Chapter Eight - Exit Mr. Pipp *
  • Chapter Nine - The Jewish Question *
  • Chapter Ten - Retaliation *
  • Chapter Eleven - The Talmud-Jew *
  • Chapter Twelve - Heinrich Ford *
  • Chapter Thirteen - Sapiro v. Ford *
  • Chapter Fourteen - Apology *
  • Chapter Fifteen - Apostle of Amity *
  • Chapter Sixteen - The Chosen People *
  • Chapter Seventeen - I Am Not a Jew Hater *
  • Chapter Eighteen - Hitler's Medal *
  • Chapter Nineteen - The Radio Priest *
  • Chapter Twenty - Transitions *
  • Afterword *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Bibliography *
  • Notes *
  • Permissions *
  • Index *
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