Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

By Neil Gerard McCluskey | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The preface of a book of this kind is like the master's den in a meticulously kept mansion. Outside the den door the author may leave his wissenschaftlich apparatus and tools, and relax within while writing a few simple lines of thanks and explanation.

The extent of the present explanation is to identify the author as a Catholic priest and a Jesuit, and to mention how this book came to be written. Nearly ten years ago a group of theological students in California met in seminar to discuss the Church-State aspects of the controversy over the decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court in the Everson and McCollum cases. One by-product of the seminar sessions was a firmer conviction in the author's mind that the fervor of the controversy could be accounted for only by something deeper than the arguments aired in public. Two basic value systems seemed to be contesting a narrow passageway with neither position yielding a step. A few years later, firsthand acquaintance with the school systems in several European countries which seemed to have somewhat resolved similar problems raised higher the question as to why the American impasse remained. Later still, participation in a series of lively seminars at Columbia University's Teachers College finally brought to a writing point the ideas of the present study.

-vii-

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Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Part One - Introduction 1
  • I - The Problem 1
  • Part Two - Horace Mann 1796-1859 11
  • II - The Shaping of a Philosophy 11
  • III - The Mandate for Christian Piety 32
  • IV - Final Controversies 66
  • Part Three - William Torrey Harris 99
  • V - New England and St. Louis 99
  • VI - The Defense of Hegel's Institutional Morality 118
  • VII - The Separation of Religion from the School 145
  • Part Four - John Dewey 1859-1952 177
  • VIII - From Hegel and Darwin to John Dewey 177
  • IX - Faith and Morals for a Democracy 203
  • X - Faith and Morals for Democracy's Schools 233
  • Part Five - Conclusion 259
  • XI - Some Meanings for Today 259
  • A Selective Bibliography 277
  • Index 305
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