Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

By Neil Gerard McCluskey | Go to book overview

VI. THE DEFENSE OF HEGEL'S INSTITUTIONAL MORALITY

One reason for the wide influence of William Torrey Harris was the prodigious output from his pen. To a young man, his secretary during several years of his term as U.S. Commissioner of Education, Harris gave this counsel:

If you have any thoughts to give to the world which you consider of value, get them printed; disseminate them. My own plan of doing this, when I was unknown to the reading world, was to get my essays published, no matter how obscure the journal in which they appeared. I asked no compensation for them, other than a few hundred reprints, which I scattered among those interested in education, art, and philosophy. Before long authors were sending me their own lucubrations. By such means I established associations and came in touch with the thinking men of the world over.1

____________________
1
Schaub, ed., William Torrey Harris, 1835-1935, p. 3. There is a reprint copy of "Art Education, the True Industrial Education" in the Butler Library which has rubber-stamped on the frontispiece: PRIVATELY PRINTED AND DONATED TO THE BUREAU OF EDUCATION BY W. T. HARRIS. No one followed Harris's advice more loyally than he himself. The 1907 Report of the Commissioner of Education, the year after his retirement, gives 479 titles. Actually the number of distinct pieces from his pen is at least double, for many of

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Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Part One - Introduction 1
  • I - The Problem 1
  • Part Two - Horace Mann 1796-1859 11
  • II - The Shaping of a Philosophy 11
  • III - The Mandate for Christian Piety 32
  • IV - Final Controversies 66
  • Part Three - William Torrey Harris 99
  • V - New England and St. Louis 99
  • VI - The Defense of Hegel's Institutional Morality 118
  • VII - The Separation of Religion from the School 145
  • Part Four - John Dewey 1859-1952 177
  • VIII - From Hegel and Darwin to John Dewey 177
  • IX - Faith and Morals for a Democracy 203
  • X - Faith and Morals for Democracy's Schools 233
  • Part Five - Conclusion 259
  • XI - Some Meanings for Today 259
  • A Selective Bibliography 277
  • Index 305
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