Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey

By Neil Gerard McCluskey | Go to book overview

PART FOUR
JOHN DEWEY 1859-1952

VIII. FROM HEGEL AND DARWIN TO JOHN DEWEY

John Dewey, who attempted to fuse the imperatives of science and nature, democracy and humanity, has in some measure touched every stone in the modern American educational structure. The development of Dewey's thought was mirrored in the vast changes that took place in modern education during his life span. His unique place has been described by his closest disciple, William Heard Kilpatrick:

Pestalozzi had prepared the ground. Froebel and Herbart had helped. Horace Mann, Henry Barnard, William T. Harris, Stanley Hall, Francis W. Parker, and others had carried America further along the Pestalozzi road. But one thing was lacking. No one of these men, nor all combined, had given an adequate theory for a thoroughgoing democratic, science- respecting education. This Professor Dewey has done.1

____________________
1
"Apprentice Citizens," Saturday Review ( Oct 22, 1949), p. 12. Kilpatrick says that work under Dewey "remade my philosophy of life and education," and rates him the third greatest philosopher of all time, "next after Plato and Aristotle and above Kant and Hegel." After achieving fame for his own contribution to education, Kilpatrick noted in his diary: "Sometimes I am vexed with myself that I find so little to object to in John Dewey's position" ( Diary, April 17, 1930). As a young instructor he consecrated himself to advance Dewey's teachings: "I

-177-

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Public Schools and Moral Education: The Influence of Horace Mann, William Torrey Harris, and John Dewey
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • Part One - Introduction 1
  • I - The Problem 1
  • Part Two - Horace Mann 1796-1859 11
  • II - The Shaping of a Philosophy 11
  • III - The Mandate for Christian Piety 32
  • IV - Final Controversies 66
  • Part Three - William Torrey Harris 99
  • V - New England and St. Louis 99
  • VI - The Defense of Hegel's Institutional Morality 118
  • VII - The Separation of Religion from the School 145
  • Part Four - John Dewey 1859-1952 177
  • VIII - From Hegel and Darwin to John Dewey 177
  • IX - Faith and Morals for a Democracy 203
  • X - Faith and Morals for Democracy's Schools 233
  • Part Five - Conclusion 259
  • XI - Some Meanings for Today 259
  • A Selective Bibliography 277
  • Index 305
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