To Have and to Hold: The Meaning of Ownership in the United States

By Neala Schleuning | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Very special thanks to:

Librarians at Mankato State University Kellian Clink, Becky Schwartzkopf and Lisa Baures, for their meticulous care and attention to my research needs. Their enthusiasm for learning and their boundless knowledge of resources sustained me on many occasions. My appreciation to Helen Waters who tracked down all my requests for special order books.

My daughter-in-law, Lyn Yount, who helped me with the tedious but important tasks of checking resources, copyediting, and proofreading.

Norine Mudrick, Production Editor at Greenwood Publishing Group, and to Kim Blue and an anonymous copyeditor for their infinite patience with my lapses, oversights and outright errors.

The Fulbright Program for my award to teach in Russia in 1995. It gave me a unique opportunity to view the United States economy from "outside" and to try to explain the economics of our consumer economy to Russian students. It was also an exciting and unique opportunity to observe a consumer society in the making.

The National Coalition of Independent Scholars (NCIS) for "being there" for writers working in non-academic settings.

Friends who provided support and encouragement: Sharon Addams, Suzanne Bunkers, Carolyn Dry, Marianne Durkin, Kathy Fromm, Diana Gabriel, Lynda Jacobson, Sandra Loerts, and Nancy Luomala.

I am especially indebted to historians Paul Gates and Phyllis Abbott and others whose work contributed to our understanding of the history of U.S. landownership. It is only against the backdrop of their work that we can appreciate the magnitude of the transition to a consumer society in the past century.

-xi-

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To Have and to Hold: The Meaning of Ownership in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - What is Property? 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Who Owns the Land? 35
  • Notes 55
  • 3 - Who Owns the United States? Part I 59
  • Notes 80
  • 4 - Who Owns the United States? Part II 83
  • Notes 100
  • 5 - The Meaning of Ownership 103
  • Notes 124
  • 6 - Consuming as Owning 127
  • Notes 149
  • 7 - Woman as Possession: Images of Owning 153
  • Notes 177
  • 8 - Beyond Consumerism: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness 181
  • Notes 209
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 235
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