To Have and to Hold: The Meaning of Ownership in the United States

By Neala Schleuning | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Jennifer Nedelsky, "Law, Boundaries, and the Bounded Self", in Law and the Order of Culture, edited by Robert Post ( Berkeley, 1991), 178.
2.
See Peter Kropotkin, Fields, Factories and Workshops Tomorrow ( New York, 1974); Peter Kropotkin, Mutual Aid: A Factor in Evolution ( Montreal, n.d); Karl Marx, Capital: A Critical Analysis of Capitalist Production, vol. 1, edited by Friederich Engels and translated by Samuel Moore and Edward Aveling ( Moscow, 1965); Karl Marx, Capital, The Communist Manifesto and Other Writings, edited by Max Eastman ( New York, 1959); Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, What Is Property? An Inquiry into the Principle of Right and Government, translated from the French by Benjamin J. Tucker, (Princeton, Mass., 1876); and Max Stimer, The Ego and His Own, edited by James J. Martin and translated by Steven T. Byington ( New York, 1973).
3.
Peter Saunders, "The Sociological Significance of Private Property Rights in Means of Consumption", International Journal of Urban and Regional Research 8, 2 ( June 1984): 215.
4.
Raoul Vaneigem, The Revolution of Everyday Life, translated by Donald Nicholson-Smith ( New York and London, 1994), 53.
5.
See E. F. Schumacher, Small Is Beautiful ( New York, 1973); E. F. Schumacher, Good Work ( New York, 1979); Kropotkin, op. cit.; Murray Bookchin, Post Scarcity Anarchism ( Berkeley, 1971); Murray Bookchin, Toward An Ecological Society ( Montreal, 1980); Murray Bookchin, Remaking Society: Pathways to a Green Future ( Boston, 1990).
6.
Andrew McLaughlin, Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology ( Albany, N. Y., 1993), 64.
7.
Ursula K. LeGuin, The Dispossessed ( New York, 1975), 120.
8.
William James Booth, Households: On the Moral Architecture of the Economy ( Ithaca, N.Y. and London, 1993), 41.
9.
McLaughlin, 76.
10.
Ward Morehouse, ed., Building Sustainable Communities: Tools and Concepts for Self-Reliant Economic Change ( New York, 1989), 15. See also C. George Benello and Dimitrios Roussopoulos, eds., The Case for Participatory Democracy ( New York. 1971).
11.
Alan Durning, "Asking How Much Is Enough", in State of the World 1991: A Worldwatch Institute Report on Progress Toward a Sustainable Society, edited by Lester R. Brown , et. al., ( New York and London, 1991), 165.
12.
Charles A. Reich, "The New Property", Yale Law Review 73, 5 ( April, 1964).
13.
Michael B. Levy, "Illiberal Liberalism: The New Property as Strategy", The Review of Politics 45, 4 ( October 1983): 588, 592.
14.
C. B. Macpherson, "Human Rights As Property Rights", in C. B. Macpherson, The Rise and Fall of Economic Justice and Other Essays: The Role of State, Class and Property in Twentieth-Century Democracy ( Oxford, 1985).
15.
William Leiss, The Limits to Satisfaction: An Essay on the Problem of Needs and Commodities ( Kingston and Montreal, 1988), 69.
16.
John Todd, "The Practice of Stewardship", in Meeting the Expectations of the Land: Essays in Sustainable Agriculture and Stewardship, edited by Wes Jackson, Wendell Berry and Bruce Colman ( San Francisco, 1984), 153.
17.
Gary Snyder, "Good, Wild, Sacred", in Meeting the Expectations of the Land: Essays in Sustainable Agriculture and Stewardship, edited by Wes Jackson, Wendell Berry and Bruce Colman ( San Francisco, 1984), 203.
18.
McLaughlin, 24.
19.
McLaughlin, 30.

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To Have and to Hold: The Meaning of Ownership in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - What is Property? 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Who Owns the Land? 35
  • Notes 55
  • 3 - Who Owns the United States? Part I 59
  • Notes 80
  • 4 - Who Owns the United States? Part II 83
  • Notes 100
  • 5 - The Meaning of Ownership 103
  • Notes 124
  • 6 - Consuming as Owning 127
  • Notes 149
  • 7 - Woman as Possession: Images of Owning 153
  • Notes 177
  • 8 - Beyond Consumerism: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness 181
  • Notes 209
  • Selected Bibliography 213
  • Index 235
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