Principles of Experimental Phonetics

By Norman J. Lass | Go to book overview

Chapter 8
Speech Perception and
Spoken Word Recognition:
Research and Theory
Stephen D. Goldinger, David B. Pisoni, Paul A. Luce Chapter Outline
Introduction
Basic Issues in Speech Perception
Linearity, Lack of Acoustic-Phonetic Invariance, and the Segmentation Problem
Units of Analysis in Speech Perception
Further Issues in Speech Perception
Specialization of Speech Perception
Perception of Speech and Nonspeech Signals
Duplex Perception
Trading Relations and Integration of Cues
Cross-Modal Cue Integration (The McGurk Effect)
Role of Linguistic Experience in Speech Perception
Studies of Speech Perception in Nonhumans
Normalization Problems in Speech Perception
Indexical Information in Speech
Talker Variability in Speech Perception and Word Recognition
Talker Variability in Memory and Attention
Prosody and Timing in Speech Perception
Theoretical Approaches to Speech Perception
Motor Theory of Speech Perception
Direct-Realist Approach to Speech Perception
Information-Processing Theories of Speech Perception
Klatt's LAFS Model
Massaro's Fuzzy Logical Model of Perception
Theoretical Approaches to Spoken Word Recognition
Logogen Theory
Cohort Theory
Forster's Autonomous Search Theory
Neighborhood Activation Model
TRACE and other Connectionist Models
Summary
Key Terms
acoustic-phonetic invariance 279
cohort 308
indexical information 295
isolation point 310
logogen 307
motor theory 282
neighborhood density 311
neighborhood frequency 311
similarity neighborhood 311
sine wave speech 283
speech mode of perception 282
suprasegmental information 300
word frequency 297

-277-

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