Principles of Experimental Phonetics

By Norman J. Lass | Go to book overview

Index
Page numbers in italics indicate illustrations.Page numbers followed by a t indicate tables.A
ABX discrimination, 537-538
Accent, 236, 237, 264
Access concept, in cohort theory, 308
Acoustic characteristics of American English; see American English, acoustic characteristics of
Acoustic cues, 199, 200
Acoustic description of different voices, 220
Acoustic energy, 237
Acoustic model training of HMM models, 423-424
Acoustic-phonetic invariance, 279, 281, 301
Acoustic phonetics, digital techniques, 470-492
cepstrum method, 473-474, 476
linear prediction method, 475-484
formant analysis, 481-483
linear prediction of speech, 476-478
linear regression, 475-476
partial correlation coefficient, 478-481
voice pitch extraction, 483-484
perceptually based analysis, 488-491
speech analysis, 470-473
Fourier transform and frequency spectrum, 472-473
hardware and computational technique developments, 470-472
speech model and parameters, 470
vocal tract area function computation methods, 484-488
background, 484-485
linear prediction, 486-488
lip impedance, 485-486
lip impulse response, 486
Acoustic properties of speech; see Perception
Acoustic regulation hypothesis, 84-85
Acoustic templates, 7
Acoustic theory of speech production, 186-198
perturbation theory, 190-192
resonating tube model for vowels, 189-190
source-filter characteristics
of fricatives, 193-195
of stops and affricates, 195-196
source-filter theory
for glides and liquids, 197-198
for nasals, 196-197
for obstruents, 192-193
for vowels, 187-189
Acoustic transduction, 364
Acoustic tube model, 193, 472, 485
Acoustic waveform
articulatory events and, 303
sound pressure (SP), 144
speech, vocal tract area function, 486
Action theory (dynamic system) models, 12, 18-23
Active elasticity, 98
Active mechanical property, 98
Active muscle properties, 96-99
Active viscosity, 98
Activity, connectionist models, 25
Actuating signal in feedback model, 13
Adaptation, 394; see also Normalization, perceptual
selective, 539-540
in speech recognition systems, 414
Adaptive processing, 364, 396
Adaptive response latencies, 106
Adducted hyperfunction, 148
Aerodynamic power, vocal intensity control, 152
Aerodynamics of speech, 47-88
aerodynamic devices, 80-84
applications and measurements with, 81-84
instrumentation, 80-81

-569-

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