Executives for the Federal Service: A Program for Action in Time of Crisis

By John J. Corson | Go to book overview

mobilization of the American economy for defense suffer from the lack of direction which typifies a new institution directed by men and women unfamiliar with a little- traveled field. The essential ingredient for the successful discharge of the vast responsibilities that have been assumed--human leadership for each of a score of emergency governmental agencies, offices, and bureaus--is distressingly scarce.1

For an indefinite period this nation must remain constantly mobilized. Can the mobilization activities made essential by the world crisis--the production of materiel, the control of prices and wages, and the provision for civilian defense in the event of attack--be planned and administered indefinitely by a half staff, available for from three to twelve months into the future or devoting only part time to the public business? The governmental leadership must be equal to the task of applying such controls as may be essential in full recognition of the vital necessity of keeping the American economy healthy, alert, and enterprising; the current struggle for the preservation of freedom will be determined more by the capacity of the American economy to produce and to grow than by the capacity of our fighting forces. The dynamic and enterprising economy that is needed to outproduce the Communist nations requires "(1) rapid progress in technology; (2) adventurous and imaginative business-

____________________
1
In a speech before the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, January 22, 1951, Karl T. Compton, Chairman of the Board of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, declared that a shortage of trained leaders for key posts "is the most serious bottleneck in the nation's defense program."

-4-

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Executives for the Federal Service: A Program for Action in Time of Crisis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xi
  • I - The Executive Crisis 3
  • II - Summary of Demand 11
  • III - Finding and Hiring Executives 18
  • IV - Reasons for Refusal 27
  • V - The Need for Action Now 48
  • VI - An Emergency Program 52
  • VII - Meeting the Continuing Need 65
  • VIII - A Pool of Career Administrators 78
  • IX - The Need for Thorough Inquiry 87
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