Murder at the Margin: A Henry Spearman Mystery

By Marshall Jevons | Go to book overview

3

CELEBRITIES WERE NOTHING NEW to Cinnamon Bay. In fact, presidents, kings, and movie stars regularly took advantage of the salubrious effects of its atmosphere. Even so, the arrival of Curtis Foote caused some stirring among the help and guests, in particular those of the fairer sex. He was the type the liquor advertisements might picture as a man of distinction. Lightly graying sideburns framed a thatch of coal black hair which he wore straight back from his forehead. His clear dark eyes and square, dimpled chin gave him the appearance of the young Cary Grant. Women were attracted to him by his rugged good looks as well as his mantle of importance.

Curtis Foote's judicial philosophy had a resemblance to that of Chief Justice Roger B. Taney of an earlier era. Like Taney, Foote placed great emphasis on the sanctity of physical and tangible property and had a distrust of federal government powers that were strong enough to endanger these rights. Unlike Taney, however, Foote had not been born into the landed gentry. While his roots were rural, his parents were of modest circumstances and it was a mystery to Supreme Court observers precisely how Foote had come to form his judicial principles.

In a way it was out of character for the Justice to visit

-19-

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Murder at the Margin: A Henry Spearman Mystery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword - Murder at the Margin vii
  • Murder at the Margin *
  • 1 3
  • 2 11
  • 3 19
  • 4 26
  • 5 36
  • 6 41
  • 7 49
  • 8 58
  • 9 76
  • 10 84
  • 11 95
  • 12 111
  • 13 139
  • 14 151
  • 15 165
  • 16 174
  • 17 185
  • Afterword 199
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