Rebellions and Revolutions: China from the 1800s to the 1980s

By Jack Gray | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY

Based on Colin McKerras, with the assistance of Robert Chan, Modern China: a Chronology from 1842 to the Present. Readers who want to pursue the study of modern Chinese history further would be well advised to keep this book at hand.

1833Dec. 10 Lord Napier appointed to lead a mission to China.
1834The British Government decides that the East India Company's
monopoly of trade with China will not be renewed.
Oct. 11 Lord Napier dies of illness in China.
1836May 17 Xu Naiqi memorializes the Emperor, arguing that the best solution
to the opium problem is to legalize the opium trade.
June Charles Elliot appointed British Superintendent of Trade.
Sept. 19The Emperor orders abolition of the opium trade.
1838-9Opium imports to China reach 40,000 chests.
1839Mar. 10 Lin Zexu arrives at Canton as Imperial Commissioner to put down
the opium trade.
24 Lin Zexu confines the British traders in their warehouses at Canton.
They are held for six weeks.
27 Superintendent of Trade Charles Elliot orders the British opium
traders to surrender their stocks of opium.
May 24The British community leaves Canton.
July 12The killing of a Chinese peasant, Lin Weihi, in a brawl near Hong
Kong precipitates a further crisis.
1840Aug. 30As the British Expedition reaches the Beihe and threatens the forts
guarding Tianjin, the Emperor appoints Qishan, Governor-General
of Zhili, to negotiate with them.
Sept. 17 Qishan persuades the British to return to Canton to continue nego-
tiations there.
1841Jan. 7 Elliot captures the Bogue forts guarding the approaches to Canton.
20 Qishan and Elliot sign the Qunbi Convention, which their respective
governments refuse to ratify.
30The Emperor appoints Yishan to command a force to annihilate
the British.
Apr. 30 Elliot dismissed and replaced by Sir Henry Pottinger.
Aug. Pottinger arrives in Hong Kong.
1842Mar. 18 Lin Zexu exiled to Kuldya (Yili).
June 19The British take Shanghai.
July 31The British take Jinjiang, leaving Nanjing open to attack.
Aug. 4British warships reach Nanjing.

-xxi-

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