The Tiger: The Rise and Fall of Tammany Hall

By Oliver E. Allen | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
10
TH E TWILIGHT

FOR TAMMANY, BEING FORCED TO LEAVE THE Wigwam on Seventeenth Street was devastating for two reasons. The loss was first of all psychological. The imposing structure had symbolized the organization's formidable power: like its predecessor on Fourteenth Street, it had been truly a grand establishment. Tammany's Wigwams were places where outsized and outlandish figures held sway and where momentous events took place. The same could never be said of a set of nondescript rooms in a midtown office building. But second, and more important, the building's loss, together with the resulting separation of the Tammany Society from the New York County Democratic Committee, effectively wiped out the Society's single most potent weapon that had helped it to endure for so long: its right to lock the clubhouse doors to any political group of which the sachems disapproved. Because the Society-owned building and the Democratic County Committee had for so long been synonymous, the Society had zealously preserved this right to great effect. With that right gone, so was its power. No longer did the Tammany sachems have the means to decree who was "regular" and who was not. Technically speaking, the Democratic County Committee was no longer synonymous with Tammany Hall, for the Society's control over it was extinct.

Yet Tammany had rebounded in the past. Was there a chance that it could do so again? Could a strong new leader emerge who would

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The Tiger: The Rise and Fall of Tammany Hall
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter 1 - The Founding 1
  • Chapter 2 - Growing Pains 27
  • Chapter 3 - Fernan Do 51
  • Chapter 4 - The Ring 80
  • Chapter 5 - Th E Collapse 118
  • Chapter 6 - Hon EST Joh N 144
  • Chapter 7 - Th E Master 170
  • Chapter 8 - Th E Silent One 206
  • Chapter 9 - The Decline 232
  • Chapter 10 - Th E Twilight 260
  • Notes 285
  • Bibliography 297
  • Index 307
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