Balancing Principles for Teaching Elementary Reading

By James V. Hoffman; James F. Baumann et al. | Go to book overview
sensitive to a wide range of individual differences. Do classrooms meet our students where they are and yet challenge them to grow? Do the reading experi. ences we offer in our classrooms prepare them to read the world of today?'.) Will the instruction we offer today prepare them to read and construct the texts of tomorrow? To answer these questions in the affirmative we must:
Anchor our pedagogy in principles that can adapt to the changing reality for literacy in our society
Anchor our pedagogy in principles that are derived from research, not "canned" program prescriptions or political directives
Anchor our pedagogy in the belief that classroom teachers must assume responsibility for making the right decisions about good instruction for the learners they teach
Anchor our pedagogy in coherent programs for instruction that pro vide the necessary support systems and organizational structures for teachers to be effective in serving all students.

These anchor points represent our professional stance. We must be articulate, reasoned, and practical in our representation of this stance to our students, to each other, as well as to the public. In the long run, we will change and adapt our stance as our inquiry and research lead us to new understandings. In the short term, though, we must enact a program of instruction that is based on our current level of understanding and uncertainty. What principles will guide us? How will our decisions be shaped? The answers to these questions are not to be found in a recipe for a balance of teaching activity and curriculum. The answers to these questions are to be found in a set of principles that are considerate of the needs of each learner as she strives to achieve balance in her literacy life.


NOTES
1
Barton D. ( 1994). Literacy: An introduction to the ecology of written language. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
2
Guthrie J. T, & Alvermann D. E. ( 1999). Engaged reading. New York: Teachers College Press.
3
Piaget J. ( 1952). The constructions of reality in the child. ( M. Cook, Trans.). New York: Basic Books.
4
Witty P. A. ( 1942). The brave and free. Teachers manual (p. 2). Boston: D.C. Heath and Company.

-9-

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Balancing Principles for Teaching Elementary Reading
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • I - Our Professional Stance 1
  • Notes 9
  • II - Our Principles and Our Practices 11
  • Notes 56
  • III - Our Past and Our Present 59
  • Notes 73
  • IV - Our Plans and Our Future 75
  • Notes 100
  • Author Index 103
  • Subject Index 107
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