Balancing Principles for Teaching Elementary Reading

By James V. Hoffman; James F. Baumann et al. | Go to book overview

discrepancies between the actual and the ideal (see Table 3.2). Indeed there remains much work to improve U.S. elementary reading instruction to provide more children higher levels of achievement, but current practices are promising and we are optimistic about the future. We are encouraged by the sensible, neo-balanced philosophy that teachers embrace today and by the major innovations and changes teachers and administrators are exploring in their districts, schools, and classrooms.13

Our surveys suggest great energy in classrooms and administrators' offices; a commitment to children, teaching, and learning; and a desire to move elementary reading instruction forward in spite of the many challenges public educators face. We did not find complacency but rather a sense of motivated urgency to move instructional principles, practices, and philosophies forward to accommodate the learners of the third millennium. We now move in the final section of this book to a discussion of how elementary educators might transform today's reading instruction into a form appropriate for "another day," that is, a reading program responsive to children of the 21st century.


NOTES
1
Austin M. C., & Morrison C., with Morrison. M. B., Sipay E. R., Gutmann A. R., Torrant K. E. , & Woodbury C. A. ( 1963). The first R: The Harvard report on reading in elementary schools. New York: Macmillan.
2
Austin & Morrison, 1963, p. 235.
3
Baumann J. F., Hoffman J. V., Duffy-Hester A. M., & Moon J. S. (in press). The First R yesterday and today: U.S. elementary reading instruction practices reported by teachers and administrators. Reading Research Quarterly.
4
Austin M. C., Morrison C., Kenney H. J., Morrison M. B., Gutmann A. R., & Nystrom J. W. ( 1961). The torchlighters: Tomorrow's teachers of reading. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
5
Austin & Morrison, 1963, p. 3.
6
McIntyre E., & Pressley M. (Eds.). (1996). Balanced instruction: Strategies and skills in whole language. Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon. Reutzel D. R., & Cooter R. B. ( 1999). Balanced reading strategies and practices: Assessing and assisting readers with special needs. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hall.
7
Baumann J. F., Hoffman J. V., Moon J., & Duffy-Hester A. M. ( 1998). "Where are teachers'voices in the phonics/whole language debate? Results from a survey of U.S. elementary classroom teachers". The Reading Teacher, 51, 636-650.
8
Spiegel D. L. ( 1998). "Silver bullets, babies, and bath water: Literature response groups in a balanced literacy program". The Reading Teacher, 52, 114-124.
9
Austin & Morrison, 1963, p. x.
10
Austin & Morrison, 1963, p. 2.
11
Austin & Morrison, 1963, p. 2.
12
Austin & Morrison, 1963, p. 218
13
Responses to open-ended questions in the surveys indicated that teachers and administrators were actively engaging in many, significant changes and innovations in reading curriculum and instruction, quite unlike the rather static state Austin and Morrison reported in 1963. See Baumann et al. (in press) for details.

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Balancing Principles for Teaching Elementary Reading
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • I - Our Professional Stance 1
  • Notes 9
  • II - Our Principles and Our Practices 11
  • Notes 56
  • III - Our Past and Our Present 59
  • Notes 73
  • IV - Our Plans and Our Future 75
  • Notes 100
  • Author Index 103
  • Subject Index 107
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 115

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.