Balancing Principles for Teaching Elementary Reading

By James V. Hoffman; James F. Baumann et al. | Go to book overview

We believe it is unfortunate that so much time and energy are spent on the seemingly endless debate about what approach to teaching reading is best. Too often, this debate leads to overzealous and underfunded initiatives that have small chance of achieving long-lasting and positive change. Clearly, the best approach to teaching reading is one that is determined through a careful process of examination of curriculum, students, community, and models of reading. Effective reading program change is influenced by teachers' reflection and self-examination related to their goals, their knowledge, and their plans to be exemplary teachers of reading. We reiterate our belief that the excellent school reading program cannot be found on a shelf. It is created in the workplaces of the school community: the teachers' lounge, the school auditorium, and teachers' and parents' kitchens and living rooms. Reading program excellence is created locally. Our hope is that this book informs the change process with which schools can go about the business of transforming practice. The challenge to teach reading well to all students is great. We believe this challenge is best considered an opportunity: an opportunity to engage in a creation process that models professionalism and accomplishment for our students, our colleagues, and our school communities. The result of this creative process is the reading program that is best for a particular school, the reading program that helps teachers and students fully realize the potential of the first r.


NOTES
1.
Williams P., Reese C., Campbell J., Mazzeo J., & Phillips G. ( 1995). 1994 NAEP Reading: A first look. Washington, DC: National Assessment of Educational Progress.
2.
Heath S. ( 1983). Ways with words: Language, life, and words in communities and classrooms. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
3.
Moll L., Amanti C., Neff D., & Gonzalez N. ( 1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory Into Practice, 31, 132-141.
4.
Allington R. ( 1980). Poor readers don't get to read much in reading groups. Language Arts, 57, 872-877.
5.
Deci E., & Ryan R. ( 1991). A motivational approach to self: Integration in personality. In R. Dienstbier (Ed.), Nebraska Symposium on Motivation: Vol. 38. Perspectives on motivation. (pp. 199-236). Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.
6.
Goswami U., & Bryant P. ( 1990). Phonological skills and learning to read. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
7.
Pressley M., & Afflerbach P. ( 1995). Verbal reports of reading: The nature of constructively responsive reading. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
8.
Rosenblatt L. ( 1938). The reader, the text, the poem. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press.
9.
Delpit L. ( 1988). The silenced dialogue: Power and pedagogy in educating other people's children. Harvard Educational Review, 56, 280-298.
10.
Shockley B., Michalove B., & Allen J. ( 1995). Engaging families: Connecting home and school literacy communities. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
11.
Vygotsky L. ( 1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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Balancing Principles for Teaching Elementary Reading
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • I - Our Professional Stance 1
  • Notes 9
  • II - Our Principles and Our Practices 11
  • Notes 56
  • III - Our Past and Our Present 59
  • Notes 73
  • IV - Our Plans and Our Future 75
  • Notes 100
  • Author Index 103
  • Subject Index 107
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