Forging Identities: Gender, Communities, and the State

By Zoya Hasan | Go to book overview

Muslim Socials and the Female
Protagonist: seeing a dominant
discourse at work

Fareed Kazmi

In 1973 Claire Johnston wrote an influential essay, "Women's Cinema is Counter Cinema," in which she argued the need for women in films to "operate at all levels." 1 Rejecting conventional definitions of realism and criticism based only on an empirical study of women's role, she called for the "development of collective work" and for a women's cinema that is not merely "captured" from the world but "constructed". The allusion to images being captured indicated her rejection of conventional realism, because to be content with capturing reality meant that one also adopted the ideology of the social status quo.

The need to "construct" resulted in the evolution of "positive images" of women. A critical debate around such images has been one of the key issues for women's counter-cinema and remains central in the Eighties and Nineties. Women who use films for consciousness-raising and workplace organising are constantly searching for representations that act as strong models to encourage confidence and collective spirit.

Despite differences in approach and theoretical framework, almost all feminist film critics are agreed on one basic fact: that "women as women" are not represented in the cinema, that they do not have a voice, that the female point of view is seldom heard. Feminist critiques have identified stereotyping (child/woman, whore, wife, mother, vamp, etc), representing women as the male Other, objectification, signification (where women are found to be signifiers not of women but of the absent phallus, of an absence rather than a presence), and cinematic voyeurism in which an exclusively male spectator is a production assumption, as typical and sexist characteristics of dominant cinema. 2

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Forging Identities: Gender, Communities, and the State
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 264

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.