Expect Miracles: Charter Schools and the Politics of Hope and Despair

By Peter W. Cookson Jr.; Kristina Berger | Go to book overview

PART TWO:
The Social and Political
Geology of Charter Schools

Public education has always been contested ground; there was never a time when public education was not a political issue. From the beginning of the common school movement in Massachusetts in the 1830s to today, Americans have been arguing with each other about the purpose and effectiveness of public education. Left, right, and center regularly exchange places in an educational game of musical chairs. In the 1960s, radical critics of public education advocated for vouchers; in the early twenty-first century it is the conservatives who favor vouchers. Even the labels left, right, and center are unclear—a citizen can be "left" on the environment and "right" on abortion without suffering cognitive dissidence. This is because we have shifted from group loyalties to individual lifestyle loyalties and in doing so, transformed politics.

Yet, it is clear that since Ronald Reagan's presidency there has been a fairly unified movement from the right of the political spectrum, and this movement has successfully gained the commanding heights in shaping the national, political, and economic agenda. By "conservative," we mean someone who supports smaller government, believes in market solutions to public and economic challenges, and is usually pro-life, anti-gun control, and somewhat nostalgic for a past when social relations were less contentious.

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Expect Miracles: Charter Schools and the Politics of Hope and Despair
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Prologue - Faith versus Reason in Educational Reform 1
  • Part One: the Landscape of Charter Schools 23
  • Part Two: The Social and Political Geology of Charter Schools 113
  • Postscript: the Goodness of America an Education for Democracy 137
  • Appendix *
  • Source Notes 181
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 195

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.