Developmental Aspects of Health Compliance Behavior

By Norman A. Krasnegor; Leonard Epstein et al. | Go to book overview

1
Enlarging the Scope of the Compliance Construct: Toward Developmental and Motivational Relevance

Paul Karoly Arizona State University


SETTING THE STAGE

One of the oldest and least productive recurrent dichotomies is that which distinguishes determinism (as a concept and/or a set of causal mechanisms) from free will (as a concept and/or a set of causal mechanisms). Among the problems generated by a belief in the validity of this categorical distinction is the assumption that science and "scientific method" are predicated upon the former, and require a renunciation of free will in any of its manifestations. As noted by Howard and Myers ( 1989), free will is not synonymous with the doctrine of nondeterminism, which is, in fact, the true opposite of deterministic models in science. The belief that events (including human actions, thoughts, and feelings) result from some cause(s) -- the essence of a deterministic philosophy -- is not innately incompatible with a belief in internal (personal, under-the-skin) sources of causation (the philosophy of agency, self-determination, internal control, or, more commonly, free will). Clearly, then, one can maintain a belief in the doctrine of determinism while simultaneously believing that some event antecedents (some of the time) are person centered.

Hence, the converse of determinism is nondeterminism, or the view that events "just happen" in an unknowable manner (a truly nonscientific stance), whereas the opposite of free will is nonagentic mechanism, or, according to Howard and Myers ( 1989), the position that: "our actions are the result of mechanisms (e.g., environmental, physiological, genetic, cultural) which are completely coercive" (p. 337). A serious, subtle, and pervasive problem in contemporary social science is the dual tendency to remain suspicious of concepts that smack of self-determination while conflating valid causal analysis with

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Developmental Aspects of Health Compliance Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 387

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.