The Young Scientists: America's Future and the Winning of the Westinghouse

By Joseph Berger | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book began as an article in the New York Times and during the book's development I wrote several other pieces for the Times on the undercovered subject of special science schools. So initial acknowledgments must go to the editors at the Times who encouraged those pieces, particularly Lawrie Mifflin, Suzanne Daley, Duayne Draffen and Gerald Boyd, and to Carolyn Lee for her generous counsel.

This book simply would not have been possible without the enthusiasm and gracious encouragement of my friend and editor at Addison-Wesley, Nancy Miller, who shared with me a childhood wonder about the young men and women who cleave to the world of science. Thanks for their fervor must also go to my agents, Michael Carlisle and Pam Bernstein. And my wife, Brenda, and daughter, Annie, gave me the quiet mornings I needed to complete this book even though it robbed them of considerable family time.

I'd like to thank all the people who let me into their schools and classrooms and chatted with me about the teaching of science: At Bronx Science, Carol Greene, Ellen Berman, Don Lamanna, and Vincent Galasso; at Stuyvesant, Richard Plass and Abraham Baumel; at Midwood, Stanley Shapiro, Jay Berman and David Kiefer; at North Carolina, Steve Warshaw, Kevin Bartkovich, John Frederick, Bill Youngblood, David Stein and Gina Norman; and so many others whose names for reasons of space I apologize for leaving out.

The folks at Westinghouse and Science Service and those long associated with these organizations were always cooperative in explaining the lore and subtleties of their contest: Carol Luszcz, Eileen Milling, Richard Gott, Dorothy Shriver, Nina Tabachnik

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The Young Scientists: America's Future and the Winning of the Westinghouse
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction - The Glittering Prizes *
  • Part I - Origins *
  • Chapter 1 - You've Got to Do Science *
  • Part II - The Schools: New York *
  • Chapter Two - A Winning System *
  • Chapter 3 - A Tree Grows in Brooklyn *
  • Chapter Four - A Teacher and His Creatures *
  • Part III - The Schools: the Heartland *
  • Chapter Five - Healing a Nation at Risk *
  • Chapter Six - Like Going to Camp All Year Long *
  • Chapter Seven - Different Strokes *
  • Part IV - The Students *
  • Chapter Eight - One Small Step for M Ankin D *
  • Chapter Nine - Rabbit Run *
  • Chapter Ten - Fathers and Sons *
  • Chapter Eleven - The Right Stuff *
  • Part V - The Families *
  • Chapter Twelve - The Huddled Masses *
  • Chapter Thirteen - What's Bred in the Bone *
  • Part VI - The Contest *
  • Chapter Fourteen - The Westinghouse Candy Store *
  • Chapter Fifteen - The Last Dance *
  • Chapter Sixteen - The Envelope, Please *
  • Chapter Seventeen - Lessons *
  • Appendices *
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