The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview

neighbors were only waiting for a chance to return to their old lives. We thought that our national industry organized like one big factory, with one omnipotent director and with one omnipotent dispatcher's office, was the ultimate achievement of human wisdom, but it all turned out to be an economic absurdity which enslaved the economic and spiritual energy of the peoples of Russia.

It is true that not everyone can withstand such a powerful wave of all-destructive truth. It is easy to get disoriented, but is it better to hide the truth? Are new lies any better? What kind of ideals do we have if we have to hide them from the people? Is it not better to admit the truth, however terrible it is? Is it not better to calm our minds and get ready for the future toils and troubles? Life goes on. We have a lot to do....


NOTES

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Aleksandr Tsipko worked for the Central Committee of the Communist Party, was deputy director of the Russian Academy's Institute of International Economic and Political Studies, and has been associated with the Gorbachev Foundation.


21 Speech at the Conference
of the Aktiv of the Khabarovsk
Territory Party Organization,
July 31, 1986

MIKHAIL S. GORBACHEV

... None of us can continue living in the old way. This is obvious. In this sense, we can say that a definite step toward acceleration has been made.

However, there is a danger that the first step will be taken as success, that we will assume that the whole situation has been taken in hand. I said this in Vladivostok. I want to say it again in Khabarovsk. If we were to draw this conclusion, we would be making a big mistake, an error. What has been achieved cannot yet satisfy us in any way. In general, one should never flatter oneself with what has been accomplished. All of us must learn this well. Such are the lessons of the past decades—the last two, at least. And now this is especially dangerous.

No profound qualitative changes that would reinforce the trend toward accelerated growth have taken place as yet. In general, comrades, important and inten

-284-

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