The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview
their demands the creation of an independent national coal-miners' union explicitly modeled on the Polish union Solidarity." ("Soviet Strikers Hint at Forming a Free Union like Solidarity," The New York Times, July 21, 1989.) Future events will show whether these demands will acquire substance and whether the workers of Siberia and Donbas will organize unions modeled on Solidarity.

The original Solidarity in Poland had many dimensions—religious and national as well as social and economic. Just as it is too early to tell whether the workers of Siberia feel any definite regional Siberian or national Russian identity, so it is impossible to detect any specific regional or national Ukrainian identity in the workers' consciousness in the Donbas or Western Ukraine. This brings to mind Ukrainian writer Yuriy Shcherbak's recent remark that unlike elsewhere in the USSR, in Ukraine there have emerged not interethnic conflicts but rather a conflict between Ukrainians and those whom Shcherbak calls "Little Russians." (Interview with Yuriy Shcherbak, interview in Literaturnaya Gazeta, Jan. 18, 1989, p. 3.) The latter term would describe those ethnic Ukrainians who prefer to consider themselves members of a larger Russian nation while preserving some specific regional Ukrainian features. Thus, the "Little Russians" represent Ukrainian supporters of an "all‐ Russian" national identity discussed earlier. It would seem, therefore, that in contemporary Ukraine, especially in such heavily Russified areas as Donbas. at least three identities are competing for popular support: Russian, Ukrainian, and "Little Russian." Conceivably, there is a fourth one too—some form of Soviet identity. The possibility of such an identity actually taking shape should not be dismissed a priori, even though the concept itself was originally "manufactured upstairs." For ample evidence on how national traditions and national identities were being "invented," that is, consciously produced (not to say manufactured) in 19th-century Europe and elsewhere, see Eric Hobsbawm and Terence Ranger, Eds., The Invention of Tradition, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1988.

87.
Alain Touraine, Return of the Actor: Social Theory in Postindustrial Society, tr. by Myrna Godzich. Minneapolis, MN, University of Minnesota Press, 1988, p. xix.

33 The Russian Question:
In Search of an Answer
(a Roundtable)

"Independence in the Name of Democracy"—that was the title of an article by V. Chichkanov, the director of the Institute of Economics of the Urals branch of the USSR Academy of Sciences and a corresponding member of the Academy, which was printed by the newspaper Soviet Russia at the end of last year. That publication marked perhaps the first time that a very well defined conclusion was overtly expressed: the restriction of the rights of Russia is vitally necessary for the persis

-398-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 725

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.