The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview
goods: they were bought cheaply and sold to us at three times the price. And with similar operations the Baltic Republics secured their relatively high economic potential.As to strictly Russian problems, our main drama is spiritual impoverishment. We stopped being a people because we lost our culture, our traditions. I think that in our spiritual re-birth the church should play a big role. Ordinary clergymen could now do an unusually great deal. And if our deputies scorn contact with the church, they are making a very big mistake.Another aspect of culture. Polish sociologists in their research have shown that 30 percent of any people can fully master a university-level course. In this respect nature turned out to be democratic. This index is the same for Yakuts, blacks, Russians, and Jews. If any nationality has more diplomas than its allowed allotment of 30 percent, then that means that they have somebody else's diplomas and as a result propagate incompetency. If any nationality in our country has too high an allotment of people with a higher education, not even speaking about Ph.D.'s and academics, then today this turns into simply a threat for all humanity. It is namely this incompetency, besides everything else, that is to blame for the tragedy of Chernobyl, for the destruction of the Aral Sea, and for many other catastrophes which occurred, are occurring, and will occur. And the Russian people need to speak out about this threat....
34 Declarations of the State
Sovereignty of the Russian
and Ukrainian Republics

DECLARATION ON THE STATE SOVEREIGNTY
OF THE RUSSIAN SOVIET FEDERATION
SOCIALIST REPUBLIC
The first RSFSR Congress of People's Deputies,
conscious of its historical responsibility for the fate of Russia,
testifying to its respect for the sovereign rights of all peoples within the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics,
expressing the will of the peoples of the RSFSR,

-403-

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