The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview

sources and its economic, human, intellectual, and military potential for implementing a policy of diktat and interference in the affairs of other states and peoples both abroad and within the country should be banned through legislation. [applause]

Second, [Yeltsin continues without waiting for applause to subside] Russia's parliament must adopt and address to the parliaments and the peoples of the other Union republics proposing the urgent commencement of negotiations on working out new, mutually acceptable, forms of comity [sodruzhestvo]. It is proposed that these negotiations should be entered into without any prior political or economic conditions.

Third, guarantees that the civil, political, economic, and property rights of that part of Russia's peoples which currently resides in other union republics will be observed must be provided by non-violent methods.

Finally the fourth point: All national and patriotic forces must rally in the struggle for the construction of a democratic and civil society in Russia. Nationwide concord in Russia is an essential condition for this at this time, which is difficult and crucial for Russia: I call upon all people's deputies and all citizens of Russia to display this. No matter how varied the viewpoints of the deputies, I think that we are all united on the fact that Russia must have full-blooded and real state sovereignty. Thank you. [applause]


NOTES

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Boris Yeltsin was president of the Congress of People's Deputies of the RSFSR at the time of this address.


36 The National Dimension

GIULIETTO CHIESA

with Douglas T. Northrop

... National and ethnic loyalties, existing independently of other foci of debate (ideological, socioeconomic, cultural, or religious), held the key to the developing Soviet civil society and its democratic structures. We therefore need to use a three-dimensional approach to understand contemporary Soviet (and post-Soviet) politics.

... Soviet sociologists Gordon and Nazimova 1 offer a two-dimensional picture of these politics as they appeared in mid-1989 [Table 11]. Their reasoning may be

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