The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview

NOTES

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Robert Legvold is professor of international relations at the Harriman Institute, Columbia University.

1.
From Vremya broadcast, Aug. 12, 1988, as reported in Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Aug. 16, p. 52.
2.
A. Kislov, in the journal Mirovaya ekonomika i mezhdunarodnye otnosheniya, August 1988, p. 39.
3.
A particularly compelling example is Aleksei Arbatov, "Parity and Reasonable Sufficiency," International Affairs, October 1988, pp. 75-87.
4.
"Perestroika, Glasnost and Foreign Policy," unpublished paper, 1988.
5.
For one of the boldest, see Igor Malashenko, "Ideals and Interests," New Times, November 1988, pp. 26-28.

38 East-West: The Problem of
Deideologizing Relations

GEORGII SHAKHNAZAROV

The new political thinking, the core of which consists of recognizing the integrity of a contradictory but interdependent world, compels us to examine anew a number of concepts having to do with theoretical and practical activity in the international sphere. It is especially important that we bring our views concerning interrelations between the states of today's two fundamental social systems—socialism and capitalism—into accord with today's objective realities, with the idea of an integral world. To an enormous extent, solving the problem of East and West is a matter on which depend not just the fates of both sides, but the very survival of humanity. And a solution to this problem is ultimately impossible without surmounting the profound ideological confrontation which is the basis of the present-day division of the world. Not economic, not intellectual, and not even political, but precisely ideological. It is entirely out of the question to eliminate the ideological differences arising from the conditions of existence, interests, and positions of modern society's principal classes and social groups. No one has the power to abolish the perpetual dispute carried on between the various ideologies of social, national, and religious origin. The question is only whether this dispute should lead to unlimited confrontation and end in a universal Bartholomew's Night.

-432-

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