The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview
59.
Bill Keller, "Soviet Deputies, in Show of Power, Block 8 Nominees," New York Times, June 28, 1989, p. 1; see also the interviews with Lapygin in Krasnaia zvezda and Izvestiia referred to above.

45 The Architects of Card Houses

YURI KATASONOV

With the growing involvement of the Army in bloody inter-ethnic conflicts in this country and the candid appeals of extremist left-wing radicals to "storm the Kremlin," on the one hand, and with the downfall of the military-political system in Eastern Europe and the prospect of a united Germany as a NATO member, on the other, the task of struggling for the Army has become especially acute and urgent.

The Army has for a long time been the object of attacks by those forces which aim to destroy our state system and transform our great power—the USSR—into a conglomerate of territories dependent on the West, torn apart by inter-ethnic and appanage quarrels. The Soviet Army—united and supra-national, linked to the people by blood, glorious in its combat traditions, and still powerful by present-day standards—remains the last obstacle on the path to the realization of these schemes.

A politically highly active group of persons with Western orientations, united by mercenary interests, are coming out as the ideologues of the campaign against the Army. These people are our homebred compradores, who have seized key positions in international political science, in official "public" organizations dealing with world affairs, and in the majority of mass media. These figures are working closely, and in some instances have actually merged, with a number of political leaders and higher functionaries in party and state organs, through whom a pernicious influence is being exerted on military policy and on the position and activity of the Army.

Simultaneously, through channels of mass information and by other means, the very same group is shaping public opinion so as to convey a negative impression of the Soviet Army, and to stimulate disrespect and animosity towards it and its representatives....

This evokes great satisfaction in the political circles of the USA and other NATO countries, which have always looked upon Soviet military power as the

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