The Soviet System: From Crisis to Collapse

By Alexander Dallin; Gail W. Lapidus | Go to book overview

47 Top-Secret KGB Memorandum
to the President of the USSR

VLADIMIR KRYUCHKOV

February 1991
Committee of State Security of the USSR
No. 219-k Moscow

Top Secret
SPECIAL FILE

To the President of the USSR
Comrade Gorbachev M.S.

ON THE POLITICAL SITUATION IN THE COUNTRY

The acute political crisis which has enveloped our country threatens the fate of perestroika, the processes of democratization, the renewal of society. The possibility of the collapse of the unity of the USSR, the destruction of the sociopolitical and economic system has become real. Provoked by the decisions of a number of Union republics, the "war of sovereignties" has practically nullified efforts to stabilize the economy and has greatly complicated conditions for the signing of a new Union treaty. Under the influence of well-known decisions of the Congress of People's Deputies and the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR the confrontations between the Center and the Union republics have received a powerful impetus. The head of the Russian parliament, together with certain forces, circles of shady business, have clearly declared their intention to create a "second Center" as a counterweight to the state political leadership of the USSR. Practically all opposition parties and movements have not failed to make use of it to strengthen their positions. National chauvinistic and separatist tendencies have increased in many regions of the country.

Events have confirmed our evaluation that the policy of appeasing the aggressive wing of the "democratic movement" is not able to forestall the spread of destructive processes and, in fact, allows the pseudo-democrats to realize unhindered their plans concerning the usurpation of power and changing the nature of the social system.

The danger of this tendency is further aggravated by the numerical growth and increasing power of illegal militarized formations. Today they have at their disposal state-of-the-art weapons, from automatic weapons and machine guns down to reactive shells. Taking into consideration this factor, social and national conflicts may assume a new character, turning into numerous hotbeds of civil war.

-569-

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