Science in the Bedroom: A History of Sex Research

By Vern L. Bullough | Go to book overview

2
HOMOSEXUALITY
AND OTHER FACTORS
IN BRINGING ABOUT
SEX RESEARCH

KARL HEINRICH ULRICHS

Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, the seminal figure in bringing about new thinking and research on same-sex love, was born August 28, 1825, in Westerfeld, East Friesland, in Hannover. He came from a long line of Lutheran pastors, and both his mother's brother and father served as such, and later one of his sisters married a pastor. His father was an architect in the service of the royal Hannoverian government and died as a result of an accident on a construction site when Ulrichs was ten. Ulrichs attended the University of Göttingen for two years, after which he transferred to the University of Berlin. In 1847, he took his examination to become a civil servant in Hannover and began to advance up the ranks until he rather abruptly resigned in 1854, probably over a homosexual incident.

As he became more conscious of his homosexuality, he, like many homosexuals both before and after him, began an investigation of same-sex attraction in an attempt to find answers. He first tried to explain it in terms of animal magnetism, basing his ideas on the earlier, and generally discarded, theories of Friedrich Anton Mesmer (1733—1815). The more he studied, the more important research into the topic became for him. In February 1862, he wrote an autobiographical statement that he deposited under seal in the Freies Deutsches Hochstift für Wissenschaften, Künste, und Algemeine Bildung (Free German Foundation for Science, Art, and General Culture) in Frankfurt, to which he belonged. In the statement, which has survived, he emphasized the necessity of researching and propagandizing on same-sex

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Science in the Bedroom: A History of Sex Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - Sex Research and Assumptions *
  • 2 - Homosexuality and Other Factors in Bringing about Sex Research *
  • 3 - Hirschfeld, Ellis, and Freud *
  • 4 - The American Experience *
  • 5 - Endocrinology Research and Changing Attitudes *
  • 6 - From Freud to Biology to Kinsey *
  • 7 - From Statistics to S Exology *
  • 8 - Th E Matter of Gender *
  • 9 - Other Voices, Other Views *
  • 10 - Problems of an Emerging Science *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
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