Science in the Bedroom: A History of Sex Research

By Vern L. Bullough | Go to book overview

5
ENDOCRINOLOGY
RESEARCH AND
CHANGING ATTITUDES

Whatever the original intent of Davis, Zinn, and Rockefeller had been in turning to the National Research Council to front serious research into human sexuality, once the formal scientific establishment was involved, the nature of sex research changed. It became university based, and the traditional physician was increasingly replaced by the Ph.D. trained in research methodology. As evidenced by the rejection of funding for Hamilton by the National Research Council, most scientists were not entirely comfortable with actual sex research conducted on humans. Because those at the NRC were laboratory scientists, they felt that the best science was done in a laboratory where conditions could be controlled. Inevitably, the Committee for Research in the Problems of Sex (CRPS) concentrated on what might be called "safer" subject areas (namely the kind of research that could be conducted in a laboratory), and consciously or unconsciously this allowed the committee to avoid the real "problem" areas (namely human sexuality, which was outlined in the original committee report).

Still the committee periodically gave lip service to the problem areas. For example, it sent an invitation to Ellis to visit the United States in the hope it could consult with him. Ellis, however, fell ill shortly after the receiving the invitation and never came. Zinn was sent to Europe to survey the research taking place there, and Davis coordinated his briefings. It is known he consulted with psychiatrists such as Freud, Eugen Bleuler, and Paul Schilder, but who else is not clear, although he made a report on his return. 1 The commit

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Science in the Bedroom: A History of Sex Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Introduction *
  • 1 - Sex Research and Assumptions *
  • 2 - Homosexuality and Other Factors in Bringing about Sex Research *
  • 3 - Hirschfeld, Ellis, and Freud *
  • 4 - The American Experience *
  • 5 - Endocrinology Research and Changing Attitudes *
  • 6 - From Freud to Biology to Kinsey *
  • 7 - From Statistics to S Exology *
  • 8 - Th E Matter of Gender *
  • 9 - Other Voices, Other Views *
  • 10 - Problems of an Emerging Science *
  • Notes *
  • Index *
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