Modern Art and the Object: A Century of Changing Attitudes

By Ellen H. Johnson | Go to book overview

List of Illustrations

Unless otherwise indicated, dimensions appear in inches and centimetres. Photographs have been
supplied by thegalleries, private collections or photographers acknowledged.
i. Paul Cézanne, Mont Sainte-Victoire, c. 1887. Oil on canvas, 26 x 353/8 (66 x 89·8). Collection of the Courtauld Institute Galleries, London.
2. Claude Monet, Haystack at Sunset near Giverny, 1891. Oil on canvas, 291/2 x 37 (75 x 94). Collection of Fine Arts, Boston, Juliana Cheney Edwards Collection (Bequest of Robert J. Edwards in memory of his mother).
3. Georges Braque, The Portuguese, 1911. Oil on canvas, 46 x 321/8 (II6·7 x 8I·5). Collection of the Kunstmuseum, Basle.
4. Wassily Kandinsky, Skizze 160A, 1912. Oil on canvas, 371/2 x 42 (95·3 x I06·7). Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, John A. and Audrey Jones Beck Collection.
5. Piet Mondrian, Pier and Ocean, 1914. Charcoal and white watercolour on buff paper, 343/8 x 44 (87·9 x III·8). Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York, The Mrs Simon Guggenheim Fund.
6. Kasimir Malevich, Suprematist Composition: Red Square and Black Square, 1914 or 1915. Oil on canvas, 28 × I71/2 (71 x 44·5). Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
7. Donald Judd, Untitled, 1967. Cold rolled steel with auto lacquer, eight pieces each 48 x 48 x 48 (122 × 122 × 122). Collection of Philip Johnson, New York. (Photo: Rudolph Burckhardt)
8. Lee Bontecou, Untitled, 1961. Welded steel and canvas, 72 x 84 x 36(183 × 2I3·5 × 9I·5). Collection of The Museum of Modern Art, New York.
9. Robert Morris, Columns, 1961. Painted aluminium, 96 x 24 x 24 (244 x 61 x 61). Courtesy of the Leo Castelli Gallery, New York. (Photo: Bruce C. Jones)
10. Claes Oldenburg, Cash Register, 1961. Muslin soaked in plaster over wire, painted with enamel, 25 × 21 x 34 (63·5 × 53 x 86). Collection ofMr and Mrs Richard L. Selle, Chicago.
ii. Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958. Encaustic on raised canvases, 307/8 x 451/2 x 5 (78·5 x II5·5 × I2·7). Collection of Mr and Mrs Burton Tremaine, Meriden, Conn.

-273-

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Modern Art and the Object: A Century of Changing Attitudes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface to the Revised Edition 7
  • Preface 9
  • 1 - Modern Art and the Object from Nineteenth-Century Nature Painting to Conceptual Art 10
  • 2 - The Object Painted and the Painted Object in Quiet Collision 65
  • 3 'the Mountain in the Painting and the Painting in the Mountain' 78
  • 4 - The Painting Freed 97
  • 5 'I Am Nature' 110
  • 6 - Object as Art 135
  • 7 - Art as Object 171
  • 8 - The Object in Jeopardy 196
  • 9 - Women Reshaping the Object 216
  • Notes 261
  • List of Illustrations 273
  • List of Figures 280
  • Acknowledgments 281
  • Index 283
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