Getting the Lead Out: The Complete Resource on How to Prevent and Cope with Lead Poisoning

By Irene Kessel; John T. O'Connor | Go to book overview

APPENDIX G

Lead Hazard Control Products

Products are grouped according to the following
categories. Specific products are presented in
each category alphabetically by manufacturer.

Spot test kits
Paint removers and strippers
Lead-specific detergents and dust removal products
Encapsulants and enclosure
systems
High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) vacuum
cleaners

Listings of water-treatment devices are available in Consumer Reports, February 1993.

Information was obtained from representations by manufacturers and distributors. We are not endorsing any specific product or guaranteeing the accuracy of this information, but simply presenting it as a starting point. Contact the listed numbers of manufacturers and distributors to get updated and more detailed information.


SPOT TEST KITS

Test kits vary by type and ease of application, what materials they can test, their accuracy, and price. Spot test kits use one of two chemicals to detect lead: sodium sulfide or sodium rhodozinate.

Sodium sulfide is more accurate and can detect lead at lower levels. It releases a noxious gas during use, however. It shows the presence of lead by turning a darker color. It is therefore not recommended for detecting lead in a dark-colored paint. It has a limited shelf life. Sodium sulfide indicates a positive result in response to other metals than lead. It is unlikely to incorrectly indicate the absence of lead, as long as it is used on light-colored paint.

Sodium rhodozinate, or rhodizonic acid, a chemical in red wine, is nontoxic. It shows the

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