Action for Mental Health: Final Report, 1961

By Joint Commission on Mental Illness and Health | Go to book overview

Appendix VII

Dissents

Francis J. Braceland, M.D.:

It is a wonderful, broad, warm, human document. It accomplishes what we were commissioned to do. Several of the points that troubled me have now been corrected.

The only thing that still concerns me a bit is our advice to the government on the tax structure. While I realize that every citizen has the right to make his opinions known, I really do not know enough to advise the government how to tax people or how to withhold taxes from others. As I read this carefully, however, I see that it simply represents an effort to get more bright kids through college; kids who are poor and who otherwise could not get through college. In other words, it advises the government that our first interest is in people and that people are our greatest resource....

Had I been writing the report, I do not think I would have been quite as positive about some things. One gets the feeling in spots of a slight air of belligerence, but I know it was not intended. Besides, I guess my efforts would be designated as pusillanimous, and I guess one is as bad as the other.


Miss Loula Dunn:

Essentially I am in full agreement with [the report], except for one recommendation. On page 268 of the report, it is recommended that all existing State hospitals of more than 1000 beds be converted into centers for the long-term and combined care of chronic diseases, including mental health. I cannot agree with this recommendation since I believe that all of the reasons which contraindicate the care of patients in large mental hospitals apply equally to the care of patients with other chronic diseases.

Authorities in planning for the chronically ill have long pointed out that the institution which cares for the long-term chronically ill patient not only must provide essential medical care and related services but also must be

-330-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Action for Mental Health: Final Report, 1961
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.